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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  August 22, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. today at 2pm: intense pressure on president trump as his former lawyer is convicted of violating campaign finance laws, implicating him in criminal behaviour. this is a witchhunt and it's a disgrace. this has nothing to do what they started out, looking for russians involved in our campaign — there were none. it comes as mr trump's former campaign manager paul manafort is found guilty in a separate court for bank and tax fraud. we'll bring you the latest from washington. the trauma of being a victim of a financial scam — coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with olly. third test all over for england. yes, in the space of three overs at
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trent bridge, a big win for india and they are right back in the series. thanks, olly, and ben has all the weather. the next couple of days will feel very different, by the weekend some of us could see some overnight crass frost. all the weather detail, plus news of a hurricane heading for how wide. thanks, ben. also coming up — plans to ban pet shops and dealers from selling puppies and kittens. the aim is to reduce health problems stemming from keeping animals in poor conditions. this is afternoon live. donald trump is under mounting pressure after his former lawyer michael cohen pleaded guilty to violating campaign finance laws and implicated the president in his crimes. mr cohen — who once said he'd take
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a bullet for the president — said he was ordered to use election funds during the 2016 presidential race to pay two women who claimed they'd had affairs with mr trump. just a short while ago, the president tweeted this: it came as anotherjury convicted donald trump's former campaign chairman paul manafort of bank and tax fraud — prior to his work for the president. our washington correspondent chris buckler reports. mr president, any reaction to the news from the manafort trial? president trump landed in west virginia to attend a rally, and to face many questions about two men who were once part of his inner circle. two men now facing substantial jail services. in new york, mr trump's former lawyer and fixer michael cohen pleaded guilty to tax fraud and breaking campaign finance laws. while just outside washington,
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a jury found the president's former campaign manager, paul manafort, guilty of a series of financial crimes, in a case brought by the special counsel robert mueller, who is investigating allegations of russian interference in america's presidential election. this is a witch—hunt, and it's a disgrace. this has nothing to do what they started out — looking for russians involved in ourcampaign. there were none. i feel very badly for paul manafort. the road manford's trial, trump defended him. he said that he was being treated worse than the mob boss al capone. mr manafort made tens of millions of dollars working for oligarchs and politicians in ukraine, money he had from the authorities in foreign bank accounts and which he used to fund a lavage and which he used to fund a lavish lifestyle, spending huge sums on property, cars and clothing including this,
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a $15,000 jacket made from ostrich. mr donald] trump! manafort‘s crimes were not connected to the period he worked for donald trump's campaign. but michael cohen claims some of the offences he committed were committed under the orders of the president. specifically, trying to influence the vote. congratulations! he says mr trump told him to pay tens of thousands of dollars to stop the porn star stormy daniels from making allegations about a sexual relationship, and to silence the former playboy model karen mcdougal from going public with claims about an affair. mr cohen pled guilty to two campaign finance charges. both for the purpose of influencing the 2016 election. in addition... what he did was he worked to pay money to silence two women who had information that he believed would be detrimental to the 2016 campaign.
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in front of his supporters in west virginia, mr trump avoided talking about his former lawyer. but he made no effort to hide his fury with the investigation and the many media reports. fake news and the russian witch hunt! we got a big combination. where is the collusion? you know, they are still looking for collusion. where is the collusion? but mr trump is now himself facing serious allegations, a truth that he might find more difficult to dismiss with his usual catchphrases. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. what do the latest developments mean for the president and what is likely to happen next? richard galpin has been looking at the potential impact of michael cohen's plea. the revelation that michael cohen, donald trump's former lawyer, had testified that he had been directed by the president to commit a federal crime involving payments
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to silence women mr trump had allegedly had affairs with is potentially the most damaging development for his presidency. welcome to cbs this morning, back—to—back legal blows for president trump... 0n american tv channels this morning, it's been headline news. with lawyers spelling out what the implications could be for mr trump. he committed a crime. he should be indicted. if he were not president, he clearly would be indicted and jailed for that crime. whether he can be indicted as president is not yet decided by the supreme court. it is possible these multiple scandals could now lead to the us congress considering impeaching the president. it's a fraught process, the outcome is farfrom certain. the segment will convene as a court
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of impeachment. bill clinton is one of only two us presidents to have been impeached in the country's history. he was acquitted in a vote in the senate and came out with record approval ratings. much depends on the mid—term elections in november, for which americans are already gearing up. all the seats in the lower house of congress are up for grabs and some in the senate. democrats need to make significant gains in the senate to ensure a successful impeachment. but analysts believe the president has been. —— weakened. there will be a political cost to the court battles and proceedings and guilty pleas and verdicts. we don't know how much that is. but if i were betting, i would say the odds are significantly higher that president trump will not finish his term than they were two days ago. for the president, there is possibly one option to make his tenure in the white house more secure. that is to pardon both michael cohen and paul manafort. it would be highly controversial and even some republicans are already dismissing the idea. the pardon is about... rewarding a person for doing
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something right, it's not about helping you as a politician. what may be the sting in the tail for the white house is that his former lawyer, michael cohen, could now give evidence to the investigation into alleged collusion between the trump campaign team and russia. he reportedly has a lot to say. we will get the latest from our correspondent in washington a little later. facebook and twitter have suspended or removed a number of accounts from its platforms linked to iran and russia, citing "inauthentic" or "manipulating" behaviour. more than 650 facebook pages and groups were called "misleading" by the company. twitter said it had suspended 284 accounts with apparent links to iran. a short while ago our media editor amol rajan gave us detail. there's been a reputationalfit
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there's been a reputational fit over the data scandal with cambridge analytica and about russian interference in democracy using facebook as a platform. within an art of facebook making that announcement, twitter said they had also got rid of accounts, and what's new in this story is that it shows companies are working closely together to attack the same people who were trying to use their platforms to spread misinformation, and it shifts the focus. we had a lot of talk about russia but most of this bad activity came to a rant and much was related to iranian state media, but what we discovered is the
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problem is a whack a mole thing. this problem will be managed rather than solve. you will never get rid of everyone and it will be better technology and machinery rather than manpower that will reduce the threat. a british man is feared dead after he was reportedly thrown from a banana boat in portugal on monday. richard chapelow is believed to have fallen from the boat along with three others at the santa clara dam in the south of the country. he had been a guest ofjon hunt, the billionaire founder of the foxtons estate agency. mr hunt said it was a time of great sorrow and that he and his family were devastated. police have discovered an illegal gun factory on an industrial estate in east sussex. components for around 30 handguns, and a large quanity of ammunition, was discovered at a warehouse in hailsham. 0fficers arrested three men at the scene — using a taser to detain one of them. the men are charged with firearms offences and will appear at kingston crown court next month.
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rya nair has apologised after nearly 190 customers who were owed compensation for cancelled and delayed flights were given cheques that bounced. a bbc investigation found that a number of customers were charged extra fees after banks rejected unsigned cheques. the airline said it had sent out 20,000 cheques last month and blamed the problem on an "administrative error". since april, more than one million ryanair passengers in europe have had delayed or cancelled flights after the airline was hit by strikes and air traffic control problems. 0ur transport correspondent tom burridge reports. there have been a few wobbles for ryanair this summer. strikes by some of its pilots and cabin crew in parts of europe caused major disruption. now the bbc has found out that some customers who were sent compensation by the airline were given an unsigned cheque. gordon fong got £1140 after a nightmare journey in june.
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he was supposed to fly from murcia in spain back home to bournemouth. but his flight was first diverted to madrid. then ryanair took him to birmingham. so he had to get a two—and—half—hour taxi to get home. surely a company of that rate has cheques, especially a large company like ryanair, these things should not happen. so i was quite embarrassed and quite annoyed, really. rya nair has apologised. it said an administrative error meant 190 unsigned cheques were sent out last month. a tiny number, it said, because in the same month it gave out a total of 20,000 compensation cheques. ryanair is now one of the world's biggest airlines. it flew 130 million passengers last year. when you have a giant airline like ryanairfailing in the most basic duty of signing cheques before they go out, it adds to the sense that this is an airline in considerable disarray.
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having said that, of course 400,000 people will fly safely and mostly on time with ryanair today. but they really need to get their management sorted out. ryanair says it has now sent out new signed cheques to affected customers. people we've spoken to say that the whole affair has cost them time and money. tom burridge, bbc news. let's return to the fallout from the conviction of president trump's former lawyer for violating campaign finance laws. chris buckler is in washington. how much pressure does this put the president under? huge pressure, bearing in mind michael cohen was a man who used to make donald trump's problems go away. he
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has pointed the finger directly at his former client, saying the candidate, who is president trump, directed him to interfere and influence an election by making payments that broke campaign finance laws. that is a serious charge against the president and it will rally support among donald trump's political opponents, who will use this to attack him and when it comes on the tail end of paul manafort, his former campaign chair, also being convicted of a series of offences, it does leave serious questions about what will happen and one other thing that's important is the fact that michael cohen is suggesting he has more information. his lawyer lanny davis has said he has knowledge of donald trump, he
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says, having knowledge of computer hacking that may have involved a foreign government and he's prepared to speak to the special council robert mueller, he would investigating russian efferent —— interference in the election, but the fact he is prepared to speak to robert mueller is significant. up to this point there was no suggestion he would co—operate but it seems thatis he would co—operate but it seems that is changing and lanny davis has gone so far as to suggest mr cowan would not entertain the idea of a pardon from the president, a real indication that a divide has been drawn between the two men. how dangerous might the information be that paul manafort holds? the question is whether he is prepared to cooperate with the special counsel. he is being prosecuted in a case brought by robert mueller,
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unlike michael cowan, and he is trying to keep pressure on him. a second trial takes place next month where paul manafort faces charges of illegal lobbying and money laundering and there will be pressure on him to cooperate or make a plea deal. his lawyer has said he doesn't want that to happen, that he is not entertain the idea of a plea deal, and paul manafort wants to ignore that, but the special counsel is interested in paul manafort, not because of what he is charged with, that old predates his time on the trump campaign, but paul manafort attended a meeting in trump tower in summer attended a meeting in trump tower in summer 2016, part of the team who met a summer 2016, part of the team who meta group summer 2016, part of the team who met a group of russians to discuss potentially getting damaging information about hillary clinton and that is why robert mueller potentially wants to speak to paul
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ma nafort potentially wants to speak to paul manafort but there is no indication of that happening yet, but you get a sense of all the swirling around the president and some in his inner circle are feeling uncomfortable today and some in the republican party are particularly uncomfortable. mr trump avoided saying too much last night at a rally in west virginia but he has broken his silence on twitter to say if anyone is looking for a good lawyer, do not retain michael cowan, a job there but it gives you a sense that he is considering all this carefully. thank you, chris buckler. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: president trump's former lawyer is convicted of violating campaign finance laws, and says the president directed him to pay hush money to two women. banks are told they should be fairer to customers who fall victim to increasingly sophisticated scams. facebook and twitter say they've taken down hundreds of accounts linked to iran and russia
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containing misinformation campaigns. and in sport, india have kept the test series alive they got the one where could they needed inside three overs. keary henri has agreed to become the new manager of bordeaux, according to reports coming out of france. he's been part of the coaching setup with belgium for two years. and serena williams has topped the forbes rich list of athletes despite taking a break from the game to have her child. the sale of puppies and kittens by pet shops and other commercial dealers in england could be banned under new government plans. the proposals, which are out for consultation, are designed to tackle unethical puppy and kitten farms. it would mean people wanting to buy or adopt a pet less than six months old would have to go to a registered breeder or to a rescue centre.
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and a warning andy moore's report contains images some viewers may find distressing. we're a nation of animal lovers, and we're willing to pay a lot of money for the right type. that's what drives the unethical breeding trade. but then there are dogs like darwin, six years old and currently unwanted, his home right now in an rspca centre in bath. under the government proposals, anyone wanting a pet would have to come to a rescue centre like this or go to a registered breeder, where they could see the puppy or the kitten with its mother. it's estimated that up to 80,000 dogs are sold every year that come from puppy farms. they often have lots of health issues and problems fitting into a home environment. i mean, it'sjust really a kind of wild west situation. we've got puppies coming from all over. we've got illegal imports. we know that there is very high levels of illegal imports that could actually be importing additional diseases into this country. and heaven knows the conditions that those poor mums are in as well, literally being used as breeding machines.
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that's the side that we don't see. lucy was the dog that, more than any other, led to this government announcement. no longer wanted as a breeding mother at a puppy farm, she was rescued with terrible injuries. the proposed ban on third—party sales, so—called lucy's law, is named after her. i've got five rescues. it takes a lot of time. but if you're just going to have one dog, the commitment is quite profound. it does change your life, and so you should think about it very, very carefully, and i think this will make the public think carefully. because they can't just say, "oh, i like that puppy, i'm going to have it." the organisation that represents many pet shops fears a new law might drive sales underground. anything that improves animal welfare has got to be good but we think there is a journey to get there rather than just an outright ban. we have seen outright bans on this industry cause problems, and we don't think this will necessarily work that quickly and that well. the government move has been generally welcomed by animal charities, but there are worries about possible loopholes.
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we do have concerns about the fact that the re—homing sector is not regulated and third—party sellers could set themselves up as a re—homing organisation, as a guise to carry on their trade. this move on its own won't close down the puppy farms, but the government and campaigners hope a whole raft of new measures will eventually mean the end of their cruel trade. andy moore, bbc news. banks have been warned by the financial 0mbudsman that it's "not fair" to automatically blame customers for falling victim to scams. only a quarter of the £2110 million lost to fraud last year was refunded — with the financial watchdog warning the growing sophistication of fraudsters means it shouldn't be assumed customers have been negligent. scams include phone calls from people claiming to be from a bank and fake websites disguised as online banking portals. with me is caroline wayman, chief ombudsman at the financial 0mbudsman service. also, i'm joined
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byjenny parkinson — she had £68,000 stolen from her bank account five years ago. welcome to you both. caroline, we will talk to you in a moment but first, jenny, what happened to you? it was saturday 15th ofjune in 2013 when i received a phone call asking for me by name and the caller said they had reason to believe my tesco cut credit card had been inappropriately used and they wanted to know if i had any other bank accounts. i told them i had a santander accounts. i told them i had a sa ntander account accounts. i told them i had a santander account and accounts. i told them i had a sa ntander account and they accounts. i told them i had a santander account and they told me santander account and they told me santander and santander account and they told me sa ntander and tesco use santander account and they told me santander and tesco use the same system, which was false but i didn't know that. i telephoned the number on the back of my card and unbeknown
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to me the fraudsters had kept the line open so they responded as santander and then line open so they responded as sa ntander and then told line open so they responded as santander and then told me that my account was under threat until me to tra nsfer account was under threat until me to transfer money to be safe secure account so it would be protected from any further fraud. i went online, they stayed on the line and eve meets accounts which turned out to bea eve meets accounts which turned out to be a barclays account, and i transferred the £68,000. when it became obvious that this money had gone where it shouldn't have gone, what did you do? a lot of people would feel daft they had gone along with it. i felt totally stupid and thought i'm not a silly person, what possessed me to do that, but we had had a fraud on our tesco card before andi had a fraud on our tesco card before and i thought it had been
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fraudulently used again that when i rang them tesco said they had made no call to me. ijust want to ask caroline, how common are stories like this? incredibly common. the fraud thatjenny like this? incredibly common. the fraud that jenny was victim to is something known as the no hang—ups camp and that is less prevalent now because steps have been taken to make it more difficult to keep phone lines open after people fell victim, but other scams are common and sophisticated and it's easy to be taken in because these people are good at what they do. how common is it for people to feel embarrassed about what's happened and not come forward ? about what's happened and not come forward? very common and i encourage people to come forward, people often say they feel embarrassed but it's important to emphasise this can happen to anyone and it's important
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to talk about it and act quickly because the quicker you act, the more likely you might get your money back. jenny, tell us how you manage to report this and get your money back. i lodged a complaint against both banks, santander and barclays, because i knew about money laundering devices and due diligence on accounts so i wondered how it could have gone through. they were dismissive, saying that i did it and in the case of barclays, either time be investigated, the money was gone and the accounts had been closed at the met followed it up, and i was advised to go to the ombudsman. i did and that was the best day because he started judging and was able to go to both banks and ask them for material i could never have got and it was his judgment
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them for material i could never have got and it was hisjudgment in january when he started questioning both banks, out of the blue i got a call saying that barclays as a gesture of goodwill would offer £68,000 ina gesture of goodwill would offer £68,000 in a full and final settle m e nt £68,000 in a full and final settlement of my complaint against them. that's a fantastic endorsement for the financial ombudsman but how culpable our way as the people this happens to rather than the banks themselves? why should they reimburse us? it depends on circumstances, customers have to ta ke circumstances, customers have to take responsibility and anything we can do to prevent things happening, there are rules about whether you make the transfer yourself but if it's an unauthorised transaction, the bank needs to show you were grossly negligent and we think that isa high grossly negligent and we think that is a high bar. what responsibilities do banks have to make sure their
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systems cannot be compromised? banks invest a lot in secure systems, this is individuals being targeted, social engineering, about trying to trick the individual and they are very good at it, we all have our pa rt very good at it, we all have our part to play but my overall message is be suspicious and if something happens and you think it might be fraud, act quickly. often regulators get accused of being toothless but in this instance you were able to help generally. we always want to look into circumstances carefully, sometimes we have to explain people will not get their money back but where the bank hasn't treated someone where the bank hasn't treated someone fairly, we can instruct them to give the money back. caroline and jenny, thank you both and i'm glad it was a happy outcome. we will now
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look at another tweet that president trump has sent out following the conviction of his former campaign manager of paul manafort. he says... paul manafort, of course, due to be sentenced in the next few days. we will have much more on that story this afternoon here on bbc news but first let's look at the weather, and ben, where are we starting today? we will start in the us and how wide, sunny scenes, that's the kind of thing you expect in hawaii but
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they also get tropical storms and hurricanes, this is a classic example of a hurricane, you can see the eye of the storm, this is a category five hurricane, sustained winds near the centre of the storm, 160 mph and it's moving close to hawaii, you can see the capital to the north, and this storm is strong. 0ne the north, and this storm is strong. one question people might have is how they work out how strong hurricanes are. there are crazy people who find out, don't they? there are people in america, the national hurricane centre, who sent an aircraft into the heart of the storm where the strongest winds are, it allows us to get a good idea of
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how strong they are but not a task i envy and if you ever see any footage of what goes on inside, it's remarkable. it sounds dangerous. for that reason people in that part of the world need to give their eye on the forecast. we have the islands of hawaii here, this shows the uncertainty in the forecast, the storm is likely to weaken but still a lot of rain and strong winds, big surf, which is normally a good thing in hawaii, you are looking at waves of 20 metres so not ideal conditions. what about our weather? for a lot of people this summer has been too hot. quieter but different to what we have had. some spots already are into the mid—20s but further west
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and north things are changing, more cloud in cheshire, the strife of cloud in cheshire, the strife of cloud is a frontal system, behind that we are getting into cooler, fresh air but humid air still holding on across east and south. we go into the rest of this afternoon, our frontal system pushing across northern england into wales, ahead of ita northern england into wales, ahead of it a fair amount of cloud but it should break up, allowing temperatures of 26 and 27 in the south—east, cooler and fresher to the north and west, then tonight the frontal system works down into the midlands, ahead of it one last humid night across the south—east of the country, further north and west, 9 degrees in newcastle, some spots in the countryside colder than that, then tomorrow some rain into north
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western areas and we open the door to this much cooler air. where will it come from? from a long way north, essentially the arctic and even at this time of year that will not be a warm direction, so tomorrow, to weather fronts, one ring warm direction, so tomorrow, to weatherfronts, one ring some rain across the south—east, another brings rain across scotland and northern ireland and into wales, with some hefty showers in the north west, some contain a rumble of thunder, a breezy day and much cooler, some green colours on our chart but even further south and east, those temperatures down on where they have been, 15 degrees for belfast and glasgow, and on friday all of us in that cooler air will see some spells of sunshine but also showers, some heavy and thundery,
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especially across the northwest, and it may be that nowhere gets to 20 degrees on friday, and the weekend is mixed, sunny spells, rain at times, cool days and chilly nights and some of us may get a touch of ground frost. that will feel different. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. donald trump's presidency has been rocked by developments in two criminal investigations involving one—time members of his inner circle. his former lawyer, michael cohen, convicted of violating campaign finance laws, says the president directed him to pay hush money to two women. in a separate trial, paul manafort, mr trump's former campaign manager, has been found guilty of tax and bank fraud. the financial 0mbudsman service has criticised banks for failing to treat customers fairly when they fall victim to fraud. it says the banks regularly try to avoid paying a refund,
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by wrongly claiming that customers were grossly negligent. facebook says it has disrupted a series of misinformation campaigns originating from iran and russia, ahead of the us mid—term elections in november. the company said it had removed more than 600 pages and numerous accounts. the government says it intends to ban the sale of puppies and kittens from pet shops in england. the aim is to reduce the number of animals that suffer health problems after being reared in poor conditions. we'll be talking to the association of optometrists after warnings that children are developing permanent problems with their vision because they are not being given eye tests early enough. sport now on afternoon live with 0lly. this is the bit where i ask you questions. i have got three today. firstly, how easy was it for england
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to make a winning third test in the end? england lost very badly. 203 runs, the margin of victory. they couldn't finish off england last night, so had to come back for the one wicket they needed this morning, and it came very quickly, jimmy anderson the last man out inside the first three overs of the day, india keeping the series alive, england 2—1 up with two to play. but the momentum is really with india. and england's batting, bar a big partnership bewteen jos buttler and ben stokes, looked very frail. the top order still deeply flawed, and will there be changes for the 11th test? it's obviously not good enough in this format. with the group of players we have got, it is well
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below par and what well capable of doing, even if it is bowler friendly conditions. so we revert back to a few things that have worked well for us in the past. we now have to carry that forward and do it for longer periods of time. we are definitely in the driving seat as far as the series goes. we have to keep remembering that. we have got time now to reflect on what has been a difficult week. but we are a very good side, bouncing back from a tough couple of days. one thing you can never question about this group of players is that character and the way they can respond to a difficult period of play. it has been a difficult four days for england. india tales. —— india tails are. what happened to those who got a ticket for today? they didn't see much play. it was all over inside
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about ten minutes play. notts came in for a lot of flak because they had already sold 2,000 tickets for a tenner for the final day and continued to sell them at that price, even though there was never going to be much play. so after a lot of pressure, mostly on social media, they decided to refund all those tickets and let everyone in for free this morning and just asked for a donation to charity... but it took a lot of heat on social media for them to do that. now, football. thierry henry is getting into management? absolutely. the arsenal legend and fantastic at barcelona as well, he was linked with the aston villa job not long
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ago over the summer. that came to nothing. thierry henry has agreed to become the new manager of bordeaux, according to reports in france. he's been a member of the belgian coaching team under roberto martinez. the rugby football union has repeated its desire to give full—time contracts to england's women. the union didn't renew the contracts of the world cup runners up, switching their resources to the sevens squad for their world cup. giselle mather is director of rugby at wasps, she says it's important to professionalise the game
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in the right way. as farasl as far as i see it, as faras i see it, it as far as i see it, it is evolutionary. you have to put women ona evolutionary. you have to put women on a platform in sport in general and has exploded, as it should have done years ago. people are now seeing that this is not a smaller, slower brand of sport. it is different and exciting. the women's game generally is an untapped platform in terms of sponsorship and media interest, and that is gaining overtime. if media interest, and that is gaining over time. if you do it quickly, it will go wrong. a slow and steady approach is howl will go wrong. a slow and steady approach is how i would look at it. you also have to look at the balance. if you make some players professional and others not, particularly in our sport, but the compact and strength element, you have a group of players who do conditioning everyday and a group who can't access that, and it will not work. serena williams has topped the forbes rich list of female atheltes for the third year in a row. she was out for over a year having a baby, and won just under £50,000 on tour, but picked up over
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1a million in endorsemnts and sponsorship deals. it's the third year running that she has come out on top, earning twice as much as any other female athlete off the court. that's all the sport for now. donald trump is under mounting pressure after his former lawyer michael cohen pleaded guilty to violating campaign finance laws and implicated the president in his crimes. mr cohen — who once said he'd take a bullet for the president — said he was ordered to use election funds during the 2016 presidential race to pay two women who claimed they'd had affairs with mr trump. it came as anotherjury convicted donald trump's former campaign chairman paul manafort of bank and tax fraud — prior to his work for the president. mr cohen's lawyer — lanny davis has been speaking to cbs news and reiterated that president trump directed cohen to make illegal payments. it's not about evidence.
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it is definitive, indisputable that donald trump's lawyers said in a letter to the special counsel that president trump directed, the same word that michael cohen used in court yesterday under oath, directed michael cohen to make illegal payments. it's not a dispute. it's not about credibility. his own lawyers used the word "directed". he lied on air force one when he said he knew nothing about it, and rudy giuliani said he can lie to the american people and it's not a crime. but his lawyers are the witnesses against him that he directed michael cohen. there is no dispute on that. that was the lawyer for michael cohen. we can speak now to angelica alvarez from cbs news. is there any other story that the american media are reporting today?
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i think michael cohen and paul ma nafort i think michael cohen and paul manafort other top stories of today. and the big question is, how will this affect president trump? you the clip from michael cohen's attorney, saying that if president trump was not president, he would be indicted and could face jail time. but we don't know if that will happen. that remains to be seen. with paul manafort, his crime is not related to russia, but the big thing there is if he faces charges and jail time, which he now does as of yesterday, being convicted on eight of the 18 counts, then just maybe, if he knows anything in relation to trump and russia, maybe he will talk to the special counsel. so the two major new stories today are the plea deal and the verdict. and how they will trickle down to the white house. trump has once again been on twitter, saying he is grateful to
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paul manafort, critical of michael cohen, don't ever go to him if you wa nt cohen, don't ever go to him if you want a lawyer, he says, clearly prising what he regards as loyalty. yes. this morning in a tweet about paul manafort, he said he feels bad for him. he said he was leaving for an event in west virginia last night and he echoed that same sentiment, that he feels bad for paul manafort. this morning, he wasjokingly that he feels bad for paul manafort. this morning, he was jokingly say in a tweet, if you need a good lawyer, i wouldn't recommend michael cohen. you might not have seen this, because you are now on air with us, but president trump has just tweeted to the effect that michael cohen actually pleaded guilty to two cou nts actually pleaded guilty to two counts of financial campaign crimes that weren't actually crimes, in his words. clearly, the courts thought they were criminal charges. tell us about the reaction from president
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trump's supporters, and also the republican party. yesterday, we heard from two republicans. they stuck pretty close to the fact. they talked about michael cohen testifying a while ago about what had happened as far as any payments. they said he stuck to his testimony. they said he stuck to his testimony. they didn't really seem to go one way or another. it is still early in the day, and we have to get more reaction as the day goes on. angelica alvarez, thank you very much. a quarter of school age children have never been taken for a sight test by their parents — that's according to a survey by the association of optometrists, which says that children are developing permanent vision problems because they are not being examined early enough. the report reveals that more than half of parents surveyed assume their child will have a full eye test at primary school. to help shead some more light on the scale of the issue,
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we can now speak to henry leonard, from the association of optometrists. why is it important that we have our children's eyes properly tested when there may be nothing wrong with them? well, we believe many children are missing out on vital eye care. it's important for children to get their eyes tested from a young age so we can pick up conditions which can be treated in good time. as you mentioned, our recent survey shows that one in four school—aged children have never had a sight test. three quarters of optometrists have seen children in the last year whose vision could have been better if they had been seen at an earlier age. what sort of conditions are the developing? the main conditions we worry about things like lazy eye. this is a condition that often gets missed because as a parent, you wouldn't necessarily realise there was a problem. it is when one eye has poor vision, or sometimes both eyes. but most children don't
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realise that is an issue. theyjust had to accept that what they have is normal. so unless you go for regular sight tests with an optometrist, you wouldn't know there was anything wrong with your child. how will regularly should we be having our children's site tested? regularly should we be having our children's site tested ?|j regularly should we be having our children's site tested? i recommend that children come into their first sight test at the age of three. most doctors see children every year or two thereafter. at any age is fine to see your optometrist. three is a good age to start. how do you test the site of a three—year—old? most of us expect to have to read the letters on that chart. yes, and a lot of parents worry about this. they feel they shouldn't take their children until the child can read letters or words. but in fact, as optometrists, we have a number of tests for younger children, often with pictures and 3—d glasses. it quite be fun —— it can be fun for children at that age. we think that a lot of these problems will be picked up at school. what sort of tests are done at school and had
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they compare with what you get at an optician's? some schools have a vision screening programme, but it depends on the local authority. it depends on the local authority. it depends whether they have that service in the area or not. and even the vision screening doesn't pick up everything you would with a full sight test. it is useful, but it doesn't check the health of the child's eyes and it doesn't tell you whether the child has a prescription for glasses. very useful survey, thank you very much. over 4,000 sites have now been listed for protection by historic england. the latest additions to the national heritage list include the head office of the bike manufacturer raleigh in nottingham, and an art art deco terminal building at birmingham airport. lizo mzimba has more. voiceover: the duchess goes on to birmingham to open the new airport that has cost well over a quarter of a million pounds... the elmdon building, opened almost 80 years ago
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by the duchess of kent, was the original terminal at what was to later become birmingham airport. it's now been given listed status as an outstanding piece of 1930s art deco architecture. the number of listed sites in england has now reached a00,000, thanks to today's latest additions. the criteria are quite wide—ranging, some of the time it will be to do with architecture or merit in quality, sometimes to do with engineering, innovation and design innovation. other times, it will be to do with an amazing story to do with the community or an individual, orjust the sheer beauty of a space or a place. other buildings to be newly listed include birches "squatter‘s cottage" in shropshire, a now rare example of the kind of agricultural accommodation that was once common in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. the former raleigh cycle company head office in nottingham is also included. it has an exterior decorated with panels showing children holding bicycle parts and tools, mimicking a production line. it was built in 1931 and for many years, the firm was the world's
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biggest manufacturer of bicycles. and more recent buildings like plymouth‘s theatre royal, which was opened in 1982 and which is seen as a striking and sophisticated example of 20th—century design. being listed means a site receives special protection, hopefully ensuring that it can continue to be appreciated and enjoyed by future generations. lizo mzimba, bbc news. maryam is here with the business news after the headlines. president trump's former lawyer is convicted of violating campaign finance laws, and says the president directed him to pay hush money to two women. banks are told they should be fairer to customers who fall victim to increasingly sophisticated scams. facebook and twitter say they've
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taken down hundreds of accounts linked to iran and russia containing misinformation campaigns. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: price comparison websites offering car insurance policies are rife with errors — according to the consumer body which? they say millions of consumers "are not getting a clear picture from the websites they visit and are receiving policy documents that differ to what was offered online". more turbulence at ryanair — angry passengers say compensation cheques they received from the airline for cancelled flights have bounced because they were unsigned. rya nair has apologised and blamed the problem on an "administrative error". and uber is close to reaching a settlement over the firm will pay £1.5 million to 56 workers who say they were victims of sexual harassment and in addition, a85 people
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will receive £8,500 each over gender and racial discrimination claims. so some records are about to be broken on the stock markets today? yes, exciting stuff going on in the united states. the s&p 500 share index, which tracks the 500 biggest public companies in america, is poised for a new record. by the end of today's trading, the index will have gone 3,453 days without a fall of 20% or more, marking the longest rally ever in us history. it is good news for the markets and pension funds. since march 2009, the index has risen almost 325% in the period, lifted by companies such as apple, microsoft and amazon. let's talk to our north america
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business correspondent, who joins us from the stock markets. how excited are people around you about this? from the stock markets. how excited are people around you about thi57m has been the subject of a lot of talk on the floor of the stock exchange. it is not inaccurate to say that many traders here are patting themselves on the back because as you mentioned, this is the longest bull market in us history and it is one that seemed inconceivable when it started during the depths of the financial crisis. at that point, we weren't sure what was going to happen. interest rates we re was going to happen. interest rates were slashed to zero and the economy was doing poorly. so the fact that we have been able to sustain this rally for nearly a decade isn't something that any trader here is being quiet about, to put it mildly. and how much worry is there that this is going to cause some kind of bubble that is going to burst, or is the word on the street where you are
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that this is sustainable, this level of positivity? you mentioned that this bull market had seen the snp rise by 400%. the last bull market that it beat was during the dot—com boom in the 19905 until 2000. at that point, the s&p 500 had risen by 470%. thi5 that point, the s&p 500 had risen by 470%. this isn't a sustained ri5e thati5 470%. this isn't a sustained ri5e that is significantly entering 470%. this isn't a sustained rise that is significantly entering into bubble territory, and that is because many here that think that what is propelling this fresh stock market is the fact that the us economy is doing well. american consumers are spending again and that has propelled american corporations to be profitable. in addition, they have been helped by a president who seems willing to give them tax breaks that allow them to boost their bottom line. all of that has contributed to a sense that the equities, the fancy jargon has contributed to a sense that the equities, the fancyjargon for stocks, are fairly priced. a5 equities, the fancyjargon for stocks, are fairly priced. as a result, this isn't something where
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we are thinking this bubble has to burst at some time, because what is powering it is quite strong. why is this important? who are the people who benefit from a stock market that continuously rises from a bull market? i was reading some articles in the american press here that were saying yes, this is an interesting milestone to be in the longest bull market in history, but we are also ina period market in history, but we are also in a period of significant income inequality, and part of that is driven by the fact that at least when it comes to the stock market, it is not everyone who is invested here. only 54% of americans have any money here in the stock market. as a result, it is those americans who benefit from bull markets like these, but that is not necessarily equally shared. the top can be sent richest in america own something like 84% of all of the stocks in the united states —— the top 10% richest own 84% of the stocks. so the wealth
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is not being shared equally. at the same time, you and i are invested in the stock market as a result of our pensions. this is something that has helped us. it can contribute to a sense that the us economy is doing well, that there is something to be said for a well, that there is something to be said fora certain well, that there is something to be said for a certain amount of momentum, and perhaps that might eventually be spread more equally across the us. kim gitlleson from the stock exchange in new york. markets, please? it is a mixed picture. the london market is keeping its head above water. investors are thinking ahead to potential trade talks between china and washington hoping that this time, there will be a resolution between the two. we also have the pound recently rallying. it has gone higher as the dollar has weakened. that is good in some senses but not so good for the companies that earn their money in dollars. diageo's
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share price is down. more from me in an hour. time for a look at the weather... this is the last day of high temperatures across eastern and south—eastern areas for the time being, so make the most of it if you do like the warmth. this is how it looked earlier in norfolk. further north, things are already changing, with cloud and outbreaks of rain courtesy of this weather front. you can see a stripe of cloud on the recent satellite picture. behind that, we get into increasingly cool air. that is the big story of the next few days. things are going to start to feel very different. for the rest of this afternoon, there is patchy rain through england and wales. to the south, still very warm. further north, much cooler and
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fresher. this evening, we continue to push our frontal system southridge sweats, the rain turning heavier for southridge sweats, the rain turning heavierfor a time southridge sweats, the rain turning heavier for a time —— southridge sweats, the rain turning heavierfor a time —— we push our frontal systems southeastwards. there is more rain pushing into the far north—west and that is associated with the next frontal system. this is really going to open the door to some much cooler air. it is extensive and we are going to start to really tap into that as the head towards the end of the week. this first frontal system is bringing rain across east anglia and the south—east. the second one is feeling as it moves across northern england into wales. behind that, a mixture of sunny spells and heavy, thundery, buttery showers. quite a breezy day, particularly up to the north—west. and a very different feel. you can see some green shades
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showing up on our temperature charts. in the south—east, temperatures will be lower than they have been. on friday, all of us are into that much cooler air. a mixture of sunny spells and showers. some of the showers will be heavy and thundery, but this showers are a little below —— the temperatures are a little below par for the time of year. the weekend is a mixed affair. there will be sunny spells and rain at times. some cool days and some pretty chilly nights. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. today at 3:00pm... intense pressure on president trump as his former lawyer is convicted of violating campaign finance laws, implicating him in criminal behaviour. the trauma of being a victim of a financial scam.
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banks are told not to automatically blame the customer. facebook and twitter say they've deleted or suspended hundreds of accounts linked to misinformation campaigns from russia and iran. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with olly foster. the third test is all overfor england... inside three overs this morning at nottingham. england captain joe inside three overs this morning at nottingham. england captainjoe root says they have a lot to learn after defeat to india by 203 runs. thanks olly, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. ben rich has all the weather. across southern and eastern parts of the uk, this is the last day of high temperatures. further north and west things have already started to change and all of us will have a significant cool down as we head towards the end of the week. all the details coming up. also coming up — plans to ban pet shops and dealers from selling puppies and kittens.
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the aim is to reduce health problems stemming from keeping animals in poor conditions. this is afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. donald trump is under mounting pressure after his former lawyer, michael cohen, pleaded guilty to violating campaign finance laws and implicated the president in his crimes. mr cohen — who once said he'd take a bullet for the president — said he was ordered to use election funds during the 2016 presidential race to pay two women who claimed they'd had affairs with mr trump. in the last hour, donald trump tweeted this... "if anyone is looking for a good lawyer, i would strongly suggest that you don t retain the services of michael cohen!" this comes as anotherjury convicted donald trump's former campaign chairman, paul manafort, of bank and tax fraud —
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prior to his work for the president. again — in the last hour — the president tweeted... "i feel very badly for paul manafort and his wonderful family. "justice" took a 12—year—old tax case, among other things, applied tremendous pressure on him and, unlike michael cohen, he refused to "break" — make up stories in order to get a "deal." such respect for a brave man!" our washington correspondent chris buckler has this report on the latest. mr president, any reaction to the news from the manafort trial? president trump landed in west virginia to attend a rally, and to face many questions about two men who were once part of his inner circle. two men who are now facing substantial jail sentences. in new york, mr trump's former lawyer and fixer michael cohen pleaded guilty to tax fraud and breaking campaign finance laws. while just outside washington, a jury found the president's former campaign manager, paul manafort, guilty of a series
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of financial crimes, in a case brought by the special counsel, robert mueller, who is investigating allegations of russian interference in america's presidential election. this is a witch—hunt, and it's a disgrace. this has nothing to do what they started out — looking for russians involved in ourcampaign. there were none. i feel very badly for paul manafort. throughout manafort‘s trial, trump defended him, at one stage even suggesting that his former campaign chairman was being treated worse than the mob boss al capone. did you talk to president trump about your indictment? manafort made tens of millions of dollars working for oligarchs and pro—russian politicians in ukraine, money he hid from the authorities in foreign bank accounts and which he used to fund a lavish lifestyle, spending huge sums on property, cars and clothing including this, $15,000 jacket made from ostrich. mr donald] trump! manafort‘s crimes were not connected
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to the period he worked for donald trump's campaign. but michael cohen claims some of the offences he admitted were committed under the orders of the president. specifically, trying to influence the vote. congratulations! he says mr trump told him to pay tens of thousands of dollars to stop the porn star stormy daniels from making allegations about a sexual relationship. and to silence the former playboy model karen mcdougal from going public with claims about an affair. mr cohen pled guilty to two campaign finance charges. both for the purpose of influencing the 2016 election. in addition, what he did was he worked to pay money to silence two women who had information that he believed would be detrimental to the 2016 campaign. in front of his supporters in west virginia, mr trump avoided
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talking about his former lawyer. but he made no effort to hide his fury with the special counsel's investigation and the many media reports. fake news and the russian witch—hunt! we got a whole big combination. booing. where is the collusion? you know, they are still looking for collusion. where is the collusion? but mr trump is now himself facing serious allegations, a truth that he might find more difficult to dismiss with his usual catchphrases. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. what do the latest developments mean for the president and what is likely to happen next? richard galpin has been looking at the potential impact of michael cohen's plea. the revelation that michael cohen, donald trump's former lawyer, had testified that he had been directed by the president to commit a federal crime involving payments to silence women mr trump had allegedly had affairs with, is potentially the most damaging
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development for his presidency. welcome to cbs this morning. back—to—back legal blows for president trump... on american tv channels this morning, it's been headline news, with lawyers spelling out what the implications could be for mr trump. he committed a crime. he should be indicted. if he were not president, he clearly would be indicted and jailed for that crime. whether he can be indicted as president, of course, is not yet decided by the supreme court. it is possible these multiple scandals could now lead to the us congress considering impeaching the president. but it's a fraught process, the outcome is farfrom certain. the senate will convene as a court of impeachment... bill clinton is one of only two us presidents to have been impeached in the country's history. he was acquitted in a vote in the senate and came out with record approval ratings. much depends on the mid—term elections in november,
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for which americxans are already gearing up. all the seats in the lower house of congress are up for grabs, and some in the senate. democrats would need to make significant gains in the senate to ensure a successful impeachment. but analysts believe the president has been weakened. there will definitely be a political cost to the court battles and proceedings and guilty pleas and verdicts. we don't know how much that is. but if i were betting, i would say the odds are significantly higher that president trump will not finish his term than they were two days ago. for the president, though, there is possibly one option to make his tenure in the white house more secure. that is to pardon both michael cohen and paul manafort. but it would be highly controversial and even some republicans are already dismissing the idea. the pardon is about rewarding a person for doing something right. it's not about helping you as a politician. what may be the sting
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in the tail for the white house is that his former lawyer, michael cohen, could now give evidence to the investigation into alleged collusion between the trump campaign team and russia. he reportedly has a lot to say. richard galpin, bbc news. well, as we've been hearing, the president has been responding in his favourite fashion — in a series of posts on twitter. let's look at what he's been saying since waking up this morning: "if anyone is looking for a good lawyer, i would strongly suggest that you don t retain the services of michael cohen! i feel very badly for paul manafort and his wonderful family. "justice" took a 12 year old tax case, among other things, applied tremendous pressure on him and, unlike michael cohen, he refused to "break" — make up stories in order to get a "deal."
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such respect for a brave man! a large number of counts, ten, could not even be decided in the paul manafort case. witch hunt! michael cohen plead guilty to two counts of campaign finance violations that are not a crime. president obama had a big campaign finance violation and it was easily settled! clearly michael cohen and the court did believe those counts were crimes. niall stanage is a white house columnist at the hill newspaper... plenty to keep a political journalist busy in washington at the moment. tell us, how dangerous are these two cases for the president? these are very dangerous indeed. it's a real crisis for the presidency that we are witnessing here. of the two, i think at the moment it's michael cohen that poses the greater dangerfor moment it's michael cohen that poses the greater danger for president trump. it's michael cohen who has directly implicated him in a crime.
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as you report pointed out, the poor ma nafort as you report pointed out, the poor manafort case pertains to what ma nafort manafort case pertains to what manafort did before working for donald trump. that's not the case with michael cohen. based on my own reporting, people close to the president have always been very worried about what michael cohen could say ever since his home and offices were raided in april. paul ma nafort offices were raided in april. paul manafort is facing a second trial. clearly the president respects him asa clearly the president respects him as a brave man, as he has said, but could paul manafort have a change of heart as well? he could, it's a late stage for that, but he could for a couple of reasons. one is the forthcoming trial you have just alluded to, set for the district of columbia next month. the other issue is that if manafort doesn't appeal yesterday's verdict, he would then be subject to sentencing. his maximum sentence for the crimes, if he were convicted, would be 80 yea rs. he were convicted, would be 80 years. it seems unlikely he would get a sentence that severe, that if he were looking for leniency he
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could make some kind of deal with prosecutors. what is all of this going to do for president trump's popularity? that is always a complicated question, for a very simple reason. there are a bout 30-35% of the simple reason. there are a bout 30—35% of the population here who while with president trump no matter what. they seem impervious, frankly, to any negative news about him. equally, there are at least that number if not more dead set against him. the question is, does it affect people in the middle ground? do we even have a middle ground left to effect? i think it does make president trump's claims of a witchhunt increasingly risible and difficult to get traction beyond his base of support. but i don't think we will see a huge sea change in his polling numbers. he appears very bullish when we hear him speak in public and on twitter. how confident are those around him that he is
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impervious? not very is the short answer. i think this is very worrisome to people around president trump. they still don't have any real clarity on all the things that he and michael cohen could have discussed all worked together on. despite president trump's criticism of michael cohen's abilities this morning, the two men were very close for more than a decade, michael cohen working as a strange amalgam of lawyer and personal fixer and enforcer. whenever you think about it in those terms, it seems at least plausible that michael cohen could have some pretty damaging information to impart. always good to talk to you. thank you very much. chris buckler is in washington. another one of these tweets where the president is saying that michael cohen was found guilty of two things that were not even a crime. yes, but folder fundamentally he has pleaded
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guilty to those crimes. although the president says they are not offences, it's difficult to say otherwise now he has pleaded guilty to them. what he is trying to do is play down the seriousness of these campaignfinance play down the seriousness of these campaign finance violations. that's because michael cohen has pointed the finger straight at president trump, saying he was the one who ordered this. he referred to him in court as the candidate, but the candidate ordered these payments to be made to try to silence two women who claim they had affairs with donald trump in order to influence the election. basically what donald trump is trying to do there is play down the significance of those crimes. he has been found guilty of them, therefore they are crimes, and asa them, therefore they are crimes, and as a result he is trying to downplay how important they are, because ultimately it affects him. he also referred again to president obama saying there was a violation there. yes, and ultimately what he will try
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to do is spread the blame for this. and ultimately, do we think president trump is going to be convicted or even indicted on any suggestions campaign violations? that'll have to be brought before the department ofjustice and it's extremely unlikely and there is debate here in the us and whether it could even happen with a sitting president. nonetheless, what he wa nts to president. nonetheless, what he wants to is push the blame away. ultimately, what you also see from those tweets is a real difference in his approach to the two men, who we re his approach to the two men, who were in his inner circle who have been convicted of crimes. he is praising paul manafort, essentially saying he was loyal and refused to doa saying he was loyal and refused to do a plea deal and was somebody who, despite pressure, was not prepared to turn on the president. on the other hand, there is every indication that michael cohen is now preparing to speak to the special counsel robert mueller, who is
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investigating allegations of russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. because michael cohen's on lawyer has been saying extremely clearly, that as far as he is concerned, michael cohen has information that would be of interest to robert mueller. suggestions, for example, that donald trump may have had pre—knowledge of computer hacking. that's something he said specifically this morning. i'm sure the trump campaign will deny that, but it gives you a sense that the sta kes a re but it gives you a sense that the stakes are being raised here and there is a feeling around president trump's on team and certainly within the republican party that there is a slight fear of further revelations and allegations to come. chris buckler in washington, thank you. banks have been warned that it's "not fair" to automatically blame customers for money lost through a scam. last year, customers transferred nearly £240 million to fraudsters, only a quarter of which was refunded
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by financial firms. the financial ombudsman service said the growing sophistication of frauds and scams meant banks cannot simply assume their customers were careless. zoe kleinman reports. £68,000 — that's how much money jenny parkinson from dorset transferred to a fraudster over the phone when she was told her bank card had been compromised and she needed to move her cash to a more secure account. she recalls the moment her actual bank told her it had all been a scab. they said, i must tell you now, because you have done the transfers, it's not our responsibility for this loss of money. upon which, i was, i actually was physically sick. because i realised that everything i had worked for, my pension lump sum, all my savings, was gone in a flash. the financial ombudsman says it's had around 8500 similar complaints this year, up by nearly 17%. last year, bank customers transferred nearly £240 million to fraudsters. it all comes down to who's to blame.
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and the banks say that if the transaction was authorised by you, it's called being grossly negligent, it's yourfault, and they don't have to pay you back. in some cases, you are actually having to work out on balance, did they or didn't they authorise it, because different legal tests apply according to that. but if you didn't, they are then saying, so, were you grossly negligent. that's the test. and what we are saying today is we think that's a pretty high bar, and so banks should be really careful in thinking about whether or not customers have been grossly negligent, notjust being careless. a high bar indeed. only a quarter of the cash transferred to fraudsters last year was ever refunded. and with scammers getting more sophisticated, it's more important than ever to stay on your guard. the key thing to remember always is to take a moment. if somebody approaches you out of the blue and asks you to do something, particularly if they are asking you to transfer money from one account to another, because that, you know, your bank, or the police, will never ask you to do that. that's a real warning sign. as forjenny, she did get her money
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back, but it took six months, and a lot of persistence. i was one of the very, very fortunate ones. many people have been left thousands of pounds out of pocket. the ombudsman is promising clearer rules on reimbursements in the near future. but people are still warned to be vigilant. zoe kleinman, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. president trump's former lawyer is convicted of violating campaign finance laws, and says the president directed him to pay hush money to two women. banks are told they should be fairer to customers who fall victim to increasingly sophisticated scams. facebook and twitter say they've taken down hundreds of accounts linked to iran and russia containing misinformation campaigns. in sport, india have won the third test by 203 runs at trent bridge,
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taking the only england wicket they needed inside three overs at the start of the final day. england's lead the series 2—1 with two to play. former arsenal striker terry thierry henry has agreed to be the next manager of french side bordeaux. kyle lafferty is close to rejoining rangers. steven gerrard says there is a verbal agreement in place for the former ibrox striker who was at the club from 2008—2012. rya nair has apologised after nearly 190 customers who were owed compensation for cancelled and delayed flights were given cheques that bounced. a bbc investigation found that a number of customers were charged extra fees after banks rejected unsigned cheques. the airline said it had sent out 20,000 cheques last month and blamed the problem on an "administrative error". since april, more than one million ryanair passengers in europe have had delayed or cancelled flights after the airline was hit by strikes
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and air traffic control problems. our transport correspondent tom burridge reports. there have been a few wobbles for ryanair this summer. strikes by some of its pilots and cabin crew in parts of europe caused major disruption. now the bbc has found out that some customers who were sent compensation by the airline were given an unsigned cheque. gordon fong got £440 after a nightmare journey in june. he was supposed to fly from murcia in spain back home to bournemouth. but his flight was first diverted to madrid. then ryanair took him to birmingham. so he had to get a two—and—half—hour taxi to get home. surely a company of that rate has cheques, especially a large corporation like ryanair, these things should not happen. so i was quite embarrassed and quite annoyed, really. rya nair has apologised. it said an administrative error meant 190 unsigned cheques were sent out last month.
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a tiny number, it said, because in the same month it gave out a total of 20,000 compensation cheques. ryanair is now one of the world's biggest airlines. it flew 130 million passengers last year. when you have a giant airline like ryanairfailing in the most basic duty of signing cheques before they go out, it adds to the sense that this is an airline in considerable disarray. having said that, of course, 400,000 people will fly safely and mostly on time with ryanair today. but they really need to get their management sorted out. ryanair says it has now sent out new signed cheques to affected customers. people we've spoken to say that the whole affair has cost them time and money. tom burridge, bbc news. the foreign secretary has been in washington for talks with his us counterpart.
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jeremy hunt met the us secretary of state mike pompeo in the past few hours. mr hunt is also set to see the white house chief of staffjohn kelly and trump advisor and son—in—law jared kushner. the meetings come amid the growing storm in washington, as the president's former personal lawyer has said he would be happy to aid the inqury into alleged collusion with russia. a british man is feared dead after he was reportedly thrown from a banana boat in portugal on monday. richard chapelow is believed to have fallen from the boat along with three others at the santa clara dam in the south of the country. he had been a guest ofjon hunt, the billionaire founder of the foxtons estate agency. mr hunt said it was a time of great sorrow and that he and his family were devastated. police have discovered an illegal gun factory on an industrial estate in east sussex. components for around 30 handguns, and a large quanity of ammunition were discovered at a warehouse in hailsham. officers arrested three
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men at the scene, using a taser to detain one of them. the men are charged with firearms offences and will appear at kingston crown court next month. letting agents in england discriminate against tenants on housing benefit, according to a new report by shelter and the national housing federation. almost half of branches asked said they had no suitable homes or landlords willing to let to benefit claimants, and one in ten banned them outright. the government says those who feel discriminated against can complain to redress schemes, which all agents must be part of. facebook and twitter have suspended or removed a number of accounts from its platforms linked to iran and russia, citing "inauthentic" or "manipulating" behaviour. more than 650 facebook pages and groups were called "misleading" by the company. meanwhile, twitter said it had suspended 284 accounts with apparent links to iran. it comes just a day after the tech giant microsoft said it had thwarted russian cyber—attacks against us conservative groups.
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the technology journalist will guyattjoins us live from bristol. thanks very much forjoining us this afternoon. why are these two technology companies acting now?m feels to me that they are doing it now because they are trying to show users about trust, they want users to trust in the platform. but they also, i believe, this is to avoid legislation from governments. silicon valley and the big tech companies have done very well up to this point not to be regulated by governments. they have self regulated. they want to show they are taking this seriously. how likely is it they will escape all regulation? i think it will be very ha rd regulation? i think it will be very hard for them to escape all regulation despite their best efforts. i think we will see more and more of this. the problem with fa ke and more of this. the problem with fake news, it used to be something governments themselves would control. now anybody can post
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something onto platforms. it would be very easy for me this afternoon to claim! be very easy for me this afternoon to claim i have seen tony hall from the bbc riding a horse in bristol. somebody on the internet would believe it. that's the problem we have now. it's very difficult to distinguish from real news and that someone has created. it's very hard to distinguish between two sides of the story now and it's really hard for people to know what is real and what isn't online. how much of it is down to us as the public to be more sensible about what we believe? that's a fair statement. if it sounds too good to be true, do not believe in it. do more research. the bbc, for example, as an organisation you have to thoroughly researched your stories. many other organisations just post what they hear to the internet. the big challenge with this is that it's quite easy for facebook to almost mechanise certain elements of their reporting in moderation. so hate
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speech, for example, is something that's very easy to mechanically track. but what you have to do in these situations is take some fairly sophisticated guesses as to whether the news source itself is viable or not and that can be increasingly hard. some of the pages pulled down from iran, they were made to look like completely independent pages set up by concerned iranians, but they were handled by news organisations at it wasn't clearly flagged. another page taken down was involved in the comet was a pro—scottish independence page, and it had to the russian facebook users. increasingly the lines between what is real and fake is becoming greyer and greyer. facebook for example, have said they don't wa nt to for example, have said they don't want to be meddling in free speech. they have also said, we are not a publisher. we just a they have also said, we are not a publisher. wejust a platform. how does this action belie those previous claims? all i would say to
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mark zuckerberg is good luck with that. because that strategy will no longer continue. in certain areas we are led to believe that they are now admitting their responsibility as a media organisation. the challenge they are facing is they don't want to open themselves up to regulation, that somebody the bbc has, for example, which is why they are still tried to call themselves a platform. but increasingly, facebook on one hand strikes big publishing content details to broadcast football around the world, but at the same time they are trying to say they are not a publisher, so that argument will get continually eroded. at some point, this is where the challenge lies, which government will take control of facebook and the organisation, and who has control over what is posted on the platform? the bigger problem is users, there is a trust issue here. if we stop believing what we see on facebook, many of us will leave the platform quicker than we are currently seeing people move away from it at the moment. thanks for talking to us today. the sale of puppies and kittens
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by pet shops and other commercial dealers in england could be banned under new government plans. the proposals, which are out for consultation, are designed to tackle unethical puppy and kitten farms. it would mean people wanting to buy or adopt a pet less than six months old would have to go to a registered breeder or to a rescue centre. we can speak now via webcam to marc abraham, who is a vet currently on shift in brighton. sorry to tear you away from all those pets. how welcome would a ban like this be in your view?|j those pets. how welcome would a ban like this be in your view? i have just got back from london and have been doing interviews all day. i presume the popularity of this intended ban is because there is so much interest. it's a really positive step, the majorfirst much interest. it's a really positive step, the major first step in tackling poppy farming, notjust in the uk and ireland, but also eastern europe. what a puppy farming has in common across all those
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countries is they depend on these third—party sellers to sell to the public, dealers and pet shops on the people meeting at motorway service stations. if you eliminate the third—party trade then you force everybody to go either to the breeder and see the puppy and kitten interact with its mother, or go to a rescue shelter, making all breeders accountable and it gives rescue centres more traffic because people will consider that option more. what sort of health problems do you see asa sort of health problems do you see as a vet from puppies and kittens that have been bought and sold in this way? a brilliant question, and that's why this law is so essential for animal welfare. puppies and kittens born on puppy farms and kittens born on puppy farms and kitten farms get transported long distances. they often have a viral mode, other bacterial infections like e. coli, they can have medical problems, conjunctivitis. they could have surgical problems. elbow and
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hip dysplasia. they are little ticking time bombs of very painful and expensive procedures. the other thing third—party sales rely on is keeping breeding dogs and cats hidden from the public. that's why breeders don't want puppies and kittens to be bought from the premises. they want them to be bought remotely sober suffering can continue behind closed doors. the breeding animals themselves will have womb infections, mammary tumours. endless caesarians. they are kept like farm animals on sawdust. there is so much suffering going on in the third—party poppy trade. thank you to michael gove and parliamentarians like caroline lucas who have been committed to ending this trade in recent years. it looks like it is in sight, and it means a brighter and happier future for this country's dogs and cats. how will it
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help, in your view, country's dogs and cats. how will it help, in yourview, in country's dogs and cats. how will it help, in your view, in helping to reduce animal cruelty, which is a separate issue to the health of these puppies and kittens. not really, the health and cruelty is very connected. if animals are abused and exploited and mated every single season, of course the animal suffers. animals that are stressed will give birth to kill puppies. it's all connected. so the more abuse, the sicker the animal. if you bring the abuse to the fore and you don't give these guys anywhere to hide, anyone in the business of selling dogs and cats for a profit has to be accountable, there is transparency. if there is a problem you know who to go back to. the problem in the past has been people trying to do the right thing and going to licensed pet shops who buy from the licensed pet farms. if there is a problem, the shop goes to
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there is a problem, the shop goes to the breeder. there is more accountability. let's make this the first major step in ending puppy and kitten farming in the uk. marc abraham, thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. this is the last time we will see warm temperatures for the time being in the south and east. we have a weather front pushing southeastwards, taking cooler air behind that. this evening across parts of eastern scotland, northern england and parts of northern ireland, temperatures are down into single digits. still pretty warm and humid across the far south—east, the last of this humid air clinging on for dear life. but during tomorrow morning, we push it out of the way as this front moves across east anglia and the south—east. behind it, spells of sunshine. really heavy
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and blustery ones across scotland. but temperatures are really dropping. all of us get into the much cooler air as we head towards the end of the week. at the weekend looks decidedly mixed. this is bbc news — our latest headlines... donald trump's presidency has been rocked by developments in two criminal investigations involving one—time members of his inner circle. his former lawyer, michael cohen, convicted of violating campaign finance laws, says the president directed him to pay hush money to two women. donald trump took to twitter, claiming two of the counts admitted by mr cohen were not crimes at all and that his former campaign chief paul manafort, who in a serarate case was convicted of eight counts of fraud, was "a brave man" the financial ombudsman service has criticised banks for failing to treat customers fairly when they fall victim to fraud.
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it says the banks regularly try to avoid paying a refund, by wrongly claiming that customers were grossly negligent. facebook says it has disrupted a series of misinformation campaigns originating from iran and russia, ahead of the us mid—term elections in november. the company said it had removed more than 600 pages and numerous accounts. the government says it intends to ban the sale of puppies and kittens from pet shops in england. the aim is to reduce the number of animals that suffer health problems after being reared in poor conditions. coming up, the story of the british wheelchair racer who's taking a break from her history coursework to race against the woman who inspired her to take up the sport at the european para athletics championships in berlin. sport now on afternoon live with olly. the third test is over and it didn't
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ta ke the third test is over and it didn't take long? it didn't. india were very impressive. 203 runs the margin of victory, they couldn't finish off england last night, so had to come back for the one wicket they needed this morning...and it came very quickly, jimmy anderson the last man out inside the first three overs of the day, india keeping the series alive, england 2—1 up with two to play. but the momentum is really with india. and england's batting, bar a big partnership bewteen jos buttler and ben stokes, looked very frail. they are going to have to work out whether this is just a they are going to have to work out whether this isjust a blip they are going to have to work out whether this is just a blip or whether this is just a blip or whether they are going to have to make a whether they are going to have to makeafairfew whether they are going to have to make a fair few changes for the fourth test, which is around the corner next week at southampton. it's obviously not good enough in this format. with the group of players we've got, it is well below par and what we are capable of doing, even if it is bowler
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friendly conditions. so we've reverted back to a few things that have worked well for us in the past. we now have to carry that forward and do it for longer periods of time. we are definitely in the driving seat as far as the series goes. we have to keep remembering that. we have got time now to reflect on what has been a difficult week. but we are a very good side, bouncing back from a tough couple of days. one thing you can never question about this group of players is their character and the way they can respond to a difficult period of play. but you can question what is going on at the top of the england order. iam sure on at the top of the england order. i am sure the selectors will be looking to make some changes. keaton jennings had a very poor series. and there has been some fuss about the tickets today? yes. notts came in for a lot of flak because they had already sold 2,000
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tickets for a tenner for the final day and continued to sell them at that price, even though there was never going to be much play, one wicket. but they continued to sell them. there was a lot of pressure overnight, on social media in particular. so they had a u—turn this morning and said, we are going to refund those tickets. they took a £20,000 hit on that. they said, you can turn up for free but we will ask you to make a donation to charity. not many turned up. let's talk about football and thierry henry. yes. remember, he was linked with the aston villa job over the summer, but that came to nothing. thierry henry has agreed to become the new manager of bordeaux, according to reports in france. he's been a member of the belgian coaching team under roberto martinez
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for the past two years. he has been very well regarded in that role. they finished third in this year's world cup. he's quit all his media committments. he clearly wants to go down the coaching route in his career. if confirmed, he'll take over from the former premier league manager gus poyet, who was suspended by the club last week for publically criticising the sale of a player. hearts striker kyle lafferty is close to rejoining rangers. the northern ireland international was previously at ibrox between 2008 to 2012. the 30—year—old has been given permission to have talks with rangers after hearts accepted an offer for the player. steven gerrard says there is a verbal agreement in place for lafferty, and he could be part of the squad to play in the europa league tomorrow night. the rugby football union
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has repeated its desire to give full—time contracts to england's women. the union didn't renew the contracts of the world cup runners up, switching their resources to the sevens squad for their world cup. giselle mather is director of rugby at wasps, she says it's important to professionalise the game in the right way. as far as i see it, it's evolutionary. you have to put it on the platform for women's sport in general and it has exploded, as it should have done years ago. people are now seeing that this is not a smaller, slower brand of sport. it is different and exciting. the women's game generally is an untapped platform in terms of sponsorship and media interest, and that is gaining over time. if you do it too quickly, it will go wrong. a slow and steady approach is how i would look at it. you also have to get
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the balance right. if you make some players professional and others not, particularly in our sport, with the comtact and strength element, you have a group of players who do conditioning everyday and a group who can't access that, the product will not work. that's all the sport for now. donald trump is under mounting pressure after his former lawyer michael cohen pleaded guilty to violating campaign finance laws and implicated the president in his crimes. mr cohen — who once said he'd take a bullet for the president — said he was ordered to use election funds during the 2016 presidential race to pay two women who claimed they'd had affairs with mr trump. it came as anotherjury convicted donald trump's former campaign chairman paul manafort of bank and tax fraud — prior to his work for the president. for more analysis on this now, steven erlanger, chief correspondent at the new york times, joins us via skype
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i know you will have been following the twists and turns of this closely. how damaging in your view are these cases for the president? they are very damaging. two of the people closest to him are now guilty of crimes, and one of them, his personal lawyer, as you have put it, has implicated the president in the commission of that crime. if donald trump were not president, he would be indicted tomorrow. but generally, sitting president are not indicted. the point is, these are campaign finance issues. this is not the russian issue, which i think it matters more to americans, the question of collusion or conspiracy with the russian government. trump presents himself obviously as the victim of the washington swamp, the elites, the fbi, robert mueller, all the clilntonites and everyone who
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didn't want him to be president, and he is pushing that line. that is going to be much more awkward for him, particularly as the mid—term elections come in november, if the republicans suffer badly. the presidency will have a big hole in it there's no about that. but in the president'sview, this is a witch—hunt. he says there is no evidence of collusion with the russians, so how does this fit in with robert mueller‘s investigation? well, this is interesting because it may be a witch—hunt, but we have got two good witches so far and turn them into puddles of water, and they are very close to him. the michael cohen case was not the mueller case, but michael cohen's lawyer says that cohen will talk to mueller in an effort to reduce his possible sentence and that cohen could do a lot of damage, knowing what he knows
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about trump's business, but also the trump's campaign. manafort, who had resisted a plea bargain, is also likely now to talk to mueller in an effort to reduce his sentence now that he has been found guilty. so the circle gets closer. collusion isn't a crime. conspiracy is a crime. the question is whether mr trump or more likely the people around him, including his son, let alone mr manafort, were guilty of trying to collude and conspire with the russians to hurt the hillary clinton campaign. that is what we will be focusing on certain. if the democrats win a majority in the house in november, they could impeach the president. that only ta kes a impeach the president. that only takes a majority vote. but the republicans are likely to keep the senate and rightly convict a
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president, which has never happened in american history, one would need two thirds of all senators to vote to convict. that is highly unlikely to convict. that is highly unlikely to happen. so for the moment, these are issues about mr trump before he became president. but the question is, did he obstructjustice? did he try to interfere in the moller investigation when he was in the white house? that could qualify as a high crime and misdemeanour which will be subject to impeachment. but there is a long way to go before then. how do you think the midterms will be affected by these court cases and the proximity to mr trump? i think they will be affected. there is no question that mr trump holds about 30% of the electorate, who are fervently for him and believe others are out to get him and the whole
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system is designed to pull him down and his supporters down, that the elite will be striking back. but it has also been true that his performance in these cases and the smell of criminality will engage many other voters who would not normally vote in the midterms, and they may vote against him, notjust for him. so it will matter a great deal. it will matter for the republican party, which has pretty much bowed down to the presidency of donald trump. it's going to be harderfor donald trump. it's going to be harder for every republican to do that in the future if mueller‘s grip gets tighter and tighter. thank you for talking to us. professor kent greenfield is a lawyer and constitutional expert at boston college of law. welcome to afternoon live. there has
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never been a successful impeachment ofa us never been a successful impeachment of a us president, but nonetheless, indulged us. tell us how an impeachment would work in theory. the vocabulary is important to keep straight. it is often confused. an impeachment is merely an indictment, which is voted on by the house of representatives, our lower house. as your previous guest says, that is done by majority vote. that is done on the basis of high crimes and misdemeanours. that term is not defined by the constitution and it is simply whatever the house says it is. there have been two presidents in our history who have been impeached by the house, andrew johnson, back in the 1800s, and then bill clinton in the 1990s. richard nixon was about to be impeached by the house when he resigned in 1974. you're right that no president has
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been removed from office. that is what happened after impeachment goes to the senate. the senate is the court that tries the indictment that is released by the house. when the trial happens in the senate, members of the house act as the prosecutors, the chiefjustice of the house act as the prosecutors, the chief justice of of the house act as the prosecutors, the chiefjustice of the united states would act over the trial and the senators‘ vote. the trial that removed a president from office would take a two thirds vote in the senate, which is highly unlikely in this political moment in the united states. can a president be prosecuted on a criminal charge? it might not have happened, but is it constitutionally possible? there is disagreement about that. in the
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department ofjustice guidelines, a president can be criminally indicted. that has not been tested by the supreme court. it was an open question during the nixon controversy in the 1970s. nixon was named as an uninvited co—conspirator, and that was essentially what happened yesterday, when michael cohen pleaded under oath to finance violations which we re oath to finance violations which were a felony. he named as his principal, the person who gave him the orders to commit these felonies, he named trump. so trump has now been directly implicated in a felony. if donald trump were not the president, he would have been indicted over the last few weeks because of these campaign finance violations. it is clear that michael cohen could serve several years in
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prison unless he gets some kind of reduction for returning evidence for mueller or other federal investigations. kent greenfield, professor of law at boston college, thank you for talking to us. maryam has the business news. first, a look at the headlines. president trump accuses his former lawyer michael cohen of making up "stories" in order to get a plea deal, after he admitted violating campaign finance laws. the financial ombudsman criticises banks for being too ready to blame customers for losing money to fraudsters. facebook and twitter say they‘ve taken down hundreds of accounts linked to iran and russia containing misinformation campaigns. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. price comparison websites offering car insurance policies are rife with errors — according to the consumer body which? they say millions of consumers "are not getting a clear picture
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from the websites they visit and are receiving policy documents that differ to what was offered online". the bank of england says scrapping one and two pence coins won‘t automatically round up prices. the statement comes after the government recently ruled out scrapping coppers, over fears that that may lead to rise in prices. and uber is close to reaching a settlwment over several sexual harassment and discrimination claims. the firm will pay £1.5 million to 56 workers who say they were victims of sexual harassment and in addition, 485 people will receive £8,500 each over gender and racial discrimination claims. a bit ofa pr a bit of a pr problem for ryanair.
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yes, imagine you had a flight cancelled and you received a cheque from ryanair as compensation. you go to cash the cheque and ends up bouncing. how embarrassing is that? very embarrassing for ryanair. only 190 passengers, to be fair to them, out of 20,000 who received these checks that were apparently unsigned, so it wasn‘t admin error by ryanair. unsigned, so it wasn‘t admin error by rya nair. but unsigned, so it wasn‘t admin error by ryanair. but a bit of a pr disaster for them when they don‘t need it. let‘s talk to meghan french, a senior news reporter at money—saving expert. when can you claim compensation? your flight needs to be an eu flights, leaving or going into an eu apple. in terms of compensation, you have to have arrived at your destination three hours late and has to have been caused by an incident within the airline's control, such
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as that staff being late or routine technical fault with the plane. so these people clearly went through these people clearly went through the process and got this compensation. what does ryanair have to say? it has apologised and has reissued these checks. undoubtedly, it will be frustrating for these people. but they have used these rights properly and they have got the compensation they were entitled to. we have heard so many stories about flight delays recently, not only about ryanair, but about so many airlines. what is going on? are more people claiming or are more flights being delayed and cancelled? we have seen a variety of problems recently. we have seen airline staff striking, and also airport staff striking, and also airport staff striking and there have been weather related issues. we are in a peak travel period, so there are undoubtedly will be more people claiming. but it is also incredibly easy to claim. there are free tools out there that will help you. thank
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you very much. let‘s ta ke let‘s take a look. sorry, that is your line! let's take a look of the markets. only because you asked so nicely. the s&p 500 is the one we have been watching. it is currently on track to get to the longest bull market, the longest time the american market has been in positive territory, and not drop 20%, in the whole of us history. it is a big dealfor whole of us history. it is a big deal for america. whole of us history. it is a big dealfor america. we have seen whole of us history. it is a big deal for america. we have seen a whole of us history. it is a big dealfor america. we have seen a bit of fluctuation in currencies today. the stronger pound has had an impact on the dollar, sorry, the pound. she is trying to save the pound is stronger against the dollar.m is trying to save the pound is stronger against the dollar. it is when you look at me with those eyes andi when you look at me with those eyes and i get scared, like you are my
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schoolteacher. you know what i mean? it is as if you are going to tell me off. stop digging! somebody take her away. at least it is the end of the hour. i could stay at home and be ignored. let‘s start again. british wheelchair racer? kare adenegan shot to stardom by breaking the world record and beating the paralympic champion hannah cockcroft at the anniversary games in london last month. tonight the 17—year—old will be taking a break from her history coursework to once again race her rival — and the woman who inspired her to take up the sport — at the european para athletics championships in berlin. kate grey has been to meet her. kare adenegan watched the london 2012 paralympics from the comfort of her own home. six years later, all eyes were on her at the london stadium as she broke the world record
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in the t34100 metres. that from kare adenegan, absolutely outstanding... beating hannah cockcroft, the athlete that inspired her all those years ago. but away from the track, kare is like any other teenager. when i‘m not training, i‘m doing work. like at the moment, i‘m doing my history coursework. it‘s a bit boring, but i also like hanging out with friends. i really enjoyjust being able to relax and not have to think about training all the time. the yaki soba is good, that‘s what my mum usually has. we are doing a—levels, which is difficult as it is, and she's out there winning medals at the same time! it's really great to have someone like that to inspire us all. so when the socialising is over, she‘s back to business. and it‘s here at the local track in coventry where kare is fully focused on her training. and with her coach, joe king, they are building towards the european championships.
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it‘s something i‘ve never done before, so it‘s time for a new challenge. i‘m hoping to go out there, just focus on myself and try and just stay consistent. i don‘t really know what to expect but as long as i‘ve done my best, i‘ll be really pleased. and the rivalry with hannah cockcroft will continue. despite beating the paralympic champion, kare still looks up to her toughest opponent. i remember when i first met her injanuary 2013, i had my phone and i wanted to take a selfie, i was literally shaking! oh, my god, it‘s hannah cockcroft! she‘s still a huge role model to me and i still think about all the success that she has had and continues to have. and i have so much respect for that. and sometimes i have to pinch myself and think wow, i‘m actually doing it. but yes, it‘s really great to race alongside her. and atjust 17 years old, kare seems to have all the ingredients of a champion and supportive friends and family with her every step of the way. kate grey, bbc news, coventry. time for a look at the weather... this is the last day of high
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temperatures across eastern and south—eastern areas for the time being, so make the most of it if you do like the warmth. this is how it looked earlier in norfolk. further north and west, things are already changing, with cloud and outbreaks of rain courtesy of this weather front. you can see a stripe of cloud on the recent satellite picture. behind that, we get into increasingly cool air. that is the big story of the next few days. things are going to start to feel very different. for the rest of this afternoon, there‘s patchy rain through england and wales. to the southeast, still very warm. further north and west, much cooler and fresher. this evening, we continue to push our frontal system southeastwards. there is more rain pushing into the far north—west
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and that is associated with the next frontal system. this is really going to open the door to some much cooler air. it is extensive and we are going to start to really tap into that as we head towards the end of the week. this first frontal system is bringing rain across east anglia and the south—east. the second one is fizzling as it moves across northern england into wales. thundery, blustery showers. quite a breezy day, particularly up to the north—west. and a very different feel. you can see some green shades showing up on our temperature charts. in the south—east, temperatures will be lower than they have been. on friday, all of us are into that much cooler air. you really will notice the
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difference. a mixture of sunny spells and showers. some of the showers will be heavy and thundery, but the temperatures are a little below par for the time of year. the weekend is a mixed affair. there will be sunny spells and rain at times. some cool days and some pretty chilly nights. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m martine croxall. today at 4:00pm... intense pressure on president trump as his former lawyer is convicted of violating campaign finance laws, implicating him in criminal behaviour. it comes as mr trump‘s former campaign manager paul manafort
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is found guilty of bank and tax fraud in a separate case. the president takes to twitter to praise mr manafort as "such a brave man" and takes aim at mr cohen, accusing him of making up stories to get a plea deal. the trauma of being a victim of a financial scam. banks are told not to automatically blame the customer. facebook and twitter say they‘ve deleted or suspended hundreds of accounts linked to misinformation campaigns from russia and iran. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with olly foster. not much to see if you had a ticket for the cricket today. just under three overs of play. a big win for india to keep the series alive and decisions for england to make after their defeat by 203 runs. and ben rich has all the weather. more chilly than it has been in a while.
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quite a lot chillier. kerumba the heatwave? much cooler weather on the way for all the fuss. —— do you remember the heatwave. and a hurricane heading to hawaii later. also coming up — plans to ban pet shops and dealers from selling puppies and kittens. the aim is to reduce health problems stemming from keeping animals in poor conditions. this is afternoon live. i‘m martine croxall. donald trump is under mounting pressure after his former lawyer michael cohen pleaded guilty to violating campaign finance laws and implicated the president in his crimes. mr cohen — who once said he‘d take a bullet for the president — said he was ordered to use election funds during the 2016 presidential race to pay two women who claimed they‘d had affairs with mr trump. in the last few hours,
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donald trump has been tweeting... "if anyone is looking for a good lawyer, i would strongly suggest that you don t retain the services of michael cohen!" this comes as anotherjury convicted donald trump‘s former campaign chairman paul manafort of bank and tax fraud — prior to his work for the president. the president also tweeted... "i feel very badly for paul manafort and his wonderful family. "justice" took a 12 year old tax case, among other things, applied tremendous pressure on him and, unlike michael cohen, he refused to "break" — make up stories in order to get a "deal." such respect for a brave man!" our washington correspondent chris buckler has this report on the latest. mr president, any reaction to the news from the manafort trial? president trump landed in west virginia to attend a rally, and to face many questions about two men who were once part of his inner circle. two men who are now facing substantial jail sentences. in new york, mr trump‘s former
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lawyer and fixer michael cohen pleaded guilty to tax fraud and breaking campaign finance laws. while just outside washington, a jury found the president‘s former campaign manager, paul manafort, guilty of a series of financial crimes, in a case brought by the special counsel, robert mueller, who is investigating allegations of russian interference in america‘s presidential election. this is a witch—hunt, and it‘s a disgrace. this has nothing to do what they started out — looking for russians involved in ourcampaign. there were none. i feel very badly for paul manafort. throughout manafort‘s trial, trump defended him, at one stage even suggesting that his former campaign chairman was being treated worse than the mob boss al capone. did you talk to president trump about your indictment? manafort made tens of millions of dollars working for oligarchs and pro—russian politicians in ukraine, money he hid from the authorities in foreign bank accounts and which he used to fund
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a lavish lifestyle, spending huge sums on property, cars and clothing including this, a $15,000 jacket made from ostrich. mr donald] trump! manafort‘s crimes were not connected to the period he worked for donald trump‘s campaign. but michael cohen claims some of the offences he admitted were committed under the orders of the president. specifically, trying to influence the vote. congratulations! he says mr trump told him to pay tens of thousands of dollars to stop the porn star stormy daniels from making allegations about a sexual relationship. and to silence the former playboy model karen mcdougal from going public with claims about an affair. mr cohen pled guilty to two campaign finance charges. both for the purpose of influencing the 2016 election. in addition, what he did was he worked to pay money to silence two women who had
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information that he believed would be detrimental to the 2016 campaign. in front of his supporters in west virginia, mr trump avoided talking about his former lawyer. but he made no effort to hide his fury with the special counsel‘s investigation and the many media reports. fake news and the russian witch—hunt! we got a whole big combination. booing. where is the collusion? you know, they are still looking for collusion. where is the collusion? but mr trump is now himself facing serious allegations, a truth that he might find more difficult to dismiss with his usual catchphrases. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. what do the latest developments mean for the president and what is likely to happen next? richard galpin has been looking at the potential impact of michael cohen‘s plea.
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the revelation that michael cohen, donald trump‘s former lawyer, had testified that he had been directed by the president to commit a federal crime involving payments to silence women mr trump had allegedly had affairs with, is potentially the most damaging development for his presidency. welcome to cbs this morning. back—to—back legal blows for president trump... on american tv channels this morning, it‘s been headline news, with lawyers spelling out what the implications could be for mr trump. he committed a crime. he should be indicted. if he were not president, he clearly would be indicted and jailed for that crime. whether he can be indicted as president, of course, is not yet decided by the supreme court. it is possible these multiple scandals could now lead to the us congress considering impeaching the president. but it‘s a fraught process, the outcome is farfrom certain. the senate will convene as a court of impeachment...
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bill clinton is one of only two us presidents to have been impeached in the country‘s history. he was acquitted in a vote in the senate and came out with record approval ratings. much depends on the mid—term elections in november, for which americans are already gearing up. all the seats in the lower house of congress are up for grabs, and some in the senate. democrats would need to make significant gains in the senate to ensure a successful impeachment. but analysts believe the president has been weakened. there will definitely be a political cost to the court battles and proceedings and guilty pleas and verdicts. we don‘t know how much that is. but if i were betting, i would say the odds are significantly higher that president trump will not finish his term than they were two days ago. for the president, though, there is possibly one option to make his tenure in the white house more secure. that is to pardon both michael cohen and paul manafort. but it would be highly controversial
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and even some republicans are already dismissing the idea. the pardon is about rewarding a person for doing something right after being convicted. it's not about helping you as a politician. what may be the sting in the tail for the white house is that his former lawyer, michael cohen, could now give evidence to the investigation into alleged collusion between the trump campaign team and russia. he reportedly has a lot to say. richard galpin, bbc news. well, as we‘ve been hearing, the president has been responding in his favourite fashion — in a series of posts on twitter. let‘s look at what else he‘s been saying this morning... in a moment we will speak to scott lucas —
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professor of international politics at the university of birmingham — but first let‘s speak to ryan heath, political editor at politico. welcome to you both. ryan first, just how damaging do you think these latest cases are for the president? i think they are very damaging in both pr and legal terms. from the pr perspective it puts the president on the back foot. trump has been effective in creating an effective parallel universe for his supporters, he whips up around his version of events and everything is defined as a witchhunt. when you start to have seven or eight of your associates found guilty or indicted ona associates found guilty or indicted on a range of different crimes, it sta rts on a range of different crimes, it starts to become clear there is one connecting factor, and in this case
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it is president trump himself. that‘s how all those people come together to be involved in all these different events. from the legal perspective, it shows robert mueller is getting closer to finishing his investigation, and that is dangerous timing the president because of the run—up to the congressional elections. if the democrats were able to take control of one of the houses of congress then it makes it very precarious for the president. they would be tempted to go down the road of impeachment. how much do his support base really care, or the republican party, for that matter? good question. trump has more than 80% of support among those who are registered republicans or who say they will vote republican. a little bit lower than the election campaign but basically everyone is sticking with him. it‘s difficult to see the country become united around this discussion and intense french ‘s divisions, but that is why trump uses the tactics of these rallies.
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-- it uses the tactics of these rallies. —— it intensifies these divisions. he explains that anyone who isn‘t on the trump side gets derided as deranged or crazy. he‘s doing that now with his former lawyer michael cohen, who knows where a lot of the buried treasure is. he was in trump‘s business files and personal dealings for 12 years, so it‘s likely there is more information to come out from the michael cohen state m e nts come out from the michael cohen statements to the robert mueller investigation. who else within the trump inner circle has cause to be concerned? we have seen separate from the robert mueller investigation that the kushner family has a lot of questionable dealings in its real estate business. jared kushner, trump‘s son—in—law, was not able to get security clearances required to do thejob he has been appointed to. you have separate but serious sets of ethical concerns that might arise on that front. a lot of concerns
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have been raised about people involved in the department of vetera ns involved in the department of veterans affairs. and you have the question of what trump will and won‘t do around thejustice department and how it handles the robert mueller investigation. we see a serious network of people and organisations where there are booby traps everywhere for trump now and thatis traps everywhere for trump now and that is why it is so dangerous for him. let's speak to professor scott lucas from the university of birmingham now. why might this be a pivotal moment for mr trump?|j birmingham now. why might this be a pivotal moment for mr trump? i think there are two reasons. the first specific one is that for the first time under oath specific one is that for the first time underoath in specific one is that for the first time under oath in a court hearing, donald trump was accused of a criminal activity, authorise payments to two women of over alleged sexual encounters and these payments were made weeks before the 2016th campaign. that is a breach
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of campaign finance law if it is backed up. michael cohen also says he can tie donald trump even closer toa he can tie donald trump even closer to a conspiracy with russia. we know michael cohen is cooperating with special counsel robert mueller. so have others who have pled guilty, such as rick gates, a senior trump official, and paul manafort, who was convicted yesterday on eight counts of financial fraud. if the wants to reduce his sentence he could reveal quite a bit about the donald trump campaign. this doesn't mean trump will leave tomorrow or next month, but it means the legal process, if not necessarily the political numbers are closing in on him. in his tweets mr trump was critical of michael cohen but praised paul manafort. why would paul manafort do a deal now? he has gone this far and he has been convicted. it's a calculation that will have to be made. michael cohen's calculation
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was, the president has thrown me under the bus and will not defend me. i'm facing 65 years of prison time so! me. i'm facing 65 years of prison time so i will cooperate. paul manafort calculation but until this point might have been, i can get off these charges or i face a relatively light penalty. that isn't the case today, he faces significant jail time, so donald trump is trying to win him back. you can still work with me. trump even dangling the possibility, i suspect, of a pardon. but does paul manafort trust that orders he decide his safety is to ta ke orders he decide his safety is to take a reduced sentence by cooperating with robert mueller? how much of a risk with issuing pardons before the donald trump? huge. at that point it looks like you are trying to obstruct justice, even that point it looks like you are trying to obstructjustice, even if not legally, then politically, trying to obstruct justice, not legally, then politically, trying to obstructjustice, and not legally, then politically, trying to obstruct justice, and that will elevate the appearance that mr trump might have tried to obstruct justice over this entire russia matter, for example when he fired
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former fbi director james matter, for example when he fired former fbi directorjames comey in 2016. -- in 2017. the foreign secretary has been in washington for talks with his us counterpart. jeremy hunt met the us secretary of state mike pompeo in the past few hours. mr hunt is also set to see the white house chief of staffjohn kelly and trump advisor and son—in—law jared jushner. the meetings come amid the growing storm in washington — as the president‘s former personal lawyer has said he would be happy to aid the inqury into alleged collusion with russia. banks have been warned that it‘s "not fair" to automatically blame customers for money lost through a scam. last year, customers transferred nearly £240 million to fraudsters, only a quarter of which was refunded by financial firms. the financial ombudsman service said the growing sophistication of frauds and scams meant banks cannot simply assume their customers is were careless. zoe kleinman reports. £68,000 — that‘s how much money jenny parkinson from dorset transferred to a fraudster over the phone when she was told her bank card had been compromised
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and she needed to move her cash to a more secure account. she recalls the moment her actual bank told her it had all been a scab. they said, i must tell you now, because you have done the transfers, it‘s not our responsibility for this loss of money. upon which, i was, i actually was physically sick. because i realised that everything i had worked for, my pension lump sum, all my savings, was gone in a flash. the financial ombudsman says it‘s had around 8500 similar complaints this year, up by nearly 17%. last year, bank customers transferred nearly £240 million to fraudsters. it all comes down to who‘s to blame. and the banks say that if the transaction was authorised by you, it‘s called being grossly negligent, it‘s yourfault, and they don‘t have to pay you back. in some cases, you are actually having to work out on balance, did they or didn't they authorise it, because different legal tests
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apply according to that. but if you didn't, they are then saying, so, were you grossly negligent. that's the test. and what we are saying today is we think that's a pretty high bar, and so banks should be really careful in thinking about whether or not customers have been grossly negligent, notjust being careless. a high bar indeed. only a quarter of the cash transferred to fraudsters last year was ever refunded. and with scammers getting more sophisticated, it‘s more important than ever to stay on your guard. the key thing to remember always is to take a moment. if somebody approaches you out of the blue and asks you to do something, particularly if they are asking you to transfer money from one account to another, because that, you know, your bank, or the police, will never ask you to do that. that‘s a real warning sign. as forjenny, she did get her money back, but it took six months, and a lot of persistence. i was one of the very, very fortunate ones. many people have been left thousands of pounds out of pocket. the ombudsman is promising clearer rules
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on reimbursements in the near future. but people are still warned to be vigilant. zoe kleinman, bbc news. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. president trump accuses his former lawyer michael cohen of making up "stories" in order to get a plea deal, after he admitted violating campaign finance laws. the financial ombudsman criticises banks for being too ready to blame customers for losing money to fraudsters. facebook and twitter say they‘ve taken down hundreds of accounts linked to iran and russia containing misinformation campaigns. why pet shops and dealers in england will be banned from selling puppies and kittens under government plans. india have won the third test by 203 runs at trent bridge taking the one england wicket they needed inside the first three overs on the final day. england now lead the series
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2—1 with two to play. uefa say they still see several uncertainties over the implemantation of the video assistant referee system and will continue to monitor its use before making any decision about adopting it in the champions league. and striker kyle lafferty has returned to rangers after hearts accepted an improved offer for the northern ireland striker. the 30—year—old, who spent four years at ibrox from 2008 to 2012, has signed a two—year deal. rya nair has apologised after nearly 190 customers who were owed compensation for cancelled and delayed flights were given cheques that bounced. a bbc investigation found that a number of customers were charged extra fees after banks rejected unsigned cheques. the airline said it had sent out 20,000 cheques last month and blamed the problem on an "administrative error". since april, more than one million ryanair passengers in europe have had delayed or cancelled flights after the airline was hit by strikes and air traffic control problems.
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our transport correspondent tom burridge reports. there have been a few wobbles for ryanair this summer. strikes by some of its pilots and cabin crew in parts of europe caused major disruption. now the bbc has found out that some customers who were sent compensation by the airline were given an unsigned cheque. gordon fong got £440 after a nightmare journey in june. he was supposed to fly from murcia in spain back home to bournemouth. but his flight was first diverted to madrid. then ryanair took him to birmingham. so he had to get a two—and—half—hour taxi to get home. surely a company of that rate has cheques, especially a large corporation like ryanair, these things should not happen. so i was quite embarrassed and quite annoyed, really. rya nair has apologised. it said an administrative error meant 190 unsigned cheques were sent out last month. a tiny number, it said, because in the same month it gave out a total of 20,000 compensation cheques.
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ryanair is now one of the world‘s biggest airlines. it flew 130 million passengers last year. when you have a giant airline like ryanairfailing in the most basic duty of signing cheques before they go out, it adds to the sense that this is an airline in considerable disarray. having said that, of course, 400,000 people will fly safely and mostly on time with ryanair today. but they really need to get their management sorted out. ryanair says it has now sent out new signed cheques to affected customers. people we‘ve spoken to say that the whole affair has cost them time and money. tom burridge, bbc news. facebook and twitter have suspended or removed a number of accounts from its platforms linked to iran and russia, citing "inauthentic" or "manipulating" behaviour. more than 650 facebook pages and groups
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were called "misleading" by the company. meanwhile, twitter said it had suspended 284 accounts with apparent links to iran. it comes just a day after the tech giant microsoft said it had thwarted russian cyber—attacks against us conservative groups. a british man is feared dead after he was reportedly thrown from a banana boat in portugal on monday. richard chapelow is believed to have fallen from the boat along with three others at the santa clara dam in the south of the country. he had been a guest ofjon hunt, the billionaire founder of the foxtons estate agency. mr hunt said it was a time of great sorrow and that he and his family were devastated. letting agents in england discriminate against tenants on housing benefit, according to a new report by shelter and the national housing federation. almost half of branches asked said they had no suitable homes or landlords willing to let
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to benefit claimants, and one in ten banned them outright. the government says those who feel discriminated against can complain to redress schemes, which all agents must be part of. the sale of puppies and kittens by pet shops under other commercial dealers in england could be banned under new government plans. the proposals, which are out for consultation, are designed to tackle unethical puppy and kitten farms. it would mean people wanting to buy or adopt a pet less than six months old would have to go to a registered breeder or to a rescue centre. and a warning andy moore‘s report contains images some viewers may find distressing. we‘re a nation of animal lovers, and we‘re willing to pay a lot of money for the right type. that‘s what drives the unethical breeding trade. but then there are dogs like darwin, six years old and currently unwanted, his home right now in an rspca centre in bath. under the government proposals, anyone wanting a pet would have to come to a rescue centre like this or go to a registered breeder,
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where they could see the puppy or the kitten with its mother. it‘s estimated that up to 80,000 dogs are sold every year that come from puppy farms. they often have lots of health issues and problems fitting into a home environment. i mean, it‘sjust really a kind of wild west situation. we‘ve got puppies coming from all over. we‘ve got illegal imports. we know that there is very high levels of illegal imports that could actually be importing additional diseases into this country. and heaven knows the conditions that those poor mums are in as well, literally being used as breeding machines. that‘s the side that we don‘t see. lucy was the dog that, more than any other, led to this government announcement. no longer wanted as a breeding mother at a puppy farm, she was rescued with terrible injuries. the proposed ban on third—party sales, so—called lucy‘s law, is named after her. i've got five rescues. it takes a lot of time. but if you're just going to have one dog, the commitment is quite profound. it does change your life, and so you should think about it
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very, very carefully, and i think this will make the public think carefully. because they can't just say, "oh, i like that puppy, i'm going to have it." the organisation that represents many pet shops fears a new law might drive sales underground. anything that improves animal welfare has got to be good but we think there is a journey to get there rather than just an outright ban. we have seen outright bans on this industry cause problems, and we don‘t think this will necessarily work that quickly and that well. the government move has been generally welcomed by animal charities, but there are worries about possible loopholes. we do have concerns about the fact that the re—homing sector is not regulated and third—party sellers could set themselves up as a re—homing organisation, as a guise to carry on their trade. this move on its own won‘t close down the puppy farms, but the government and campaigners hope a whole raft of new measures will eventually mean the end of their cruel trade. andy moore, bbc news. some breaking news to bring you from
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an oil refinery in cheshire. firefighters have been called to the stand low oil refinery at ellesmere port where flames and clouds of thick smoke can be seen all around. the site has been evacuated according to cheshire fire service. the force was called just after 2:15pm this afternoon and it‘s believed the fire is in a manufacturing building inside the plan. the refinery employs around 900 people and an additional 900 contractors on the staff. —— additional 500 contractors. it provides 60% of all road transport fuels and six fire engines are on the scene, which is on oil site road at the moment. stanlow is a very important site, producing 4.4
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billion litres of diesel and 3 billion litres of diesel and 3 billion litres of petrol annually according to sr oil uk. all staff accounted for, but six fire engines in attendance at stanlow oil refinery. time for a look at the weather... ben rich, why are you showing us hawaii? i wonder with the weather we have coming up, the coolerfeel, you might be thinking of going on holiday to hawaii. and why not, the gorgeous scenes you can get, beautiful sunshine and lovely warm weather. however there is always the risk of a hurricane in the middle of the pacific. not common for a hurricane to make a direct hit, but it‘s a small group of islands so that‘s no great surprise. this is hurricane lane which has been spinning up in the last couple of days. it was category five and it‘s nowjust down toa category five and it‘s nowjust down to a category four, but still in the
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centre of the storm close to the eye you have winds close to 185 mph. who would want to fly into the middle of one oddly i think i might, if i was in the hands of people who knew what they were doing. there are people who fly into the middle of these storms. essentiallyjust to who fly into the middle of these storms. essentially just to take readings of how strong the winds are and what the air pressure is like. they give us really important details to help get the forecast right. they go up in aircraft like this, various instruments attached, and these hurricane hunters can tell us huge amounts and contribute to the forecast. the forecast for hawaii, this is the uncertainty cone, as we call it, giving an idea of the uncertainty as to where the storm is likely to track, but over the next couple of days is very close to the islands of hawaii, torrential rain and damaging wind and some really big waves. big surf
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is what they want in hawaii, but probably not that big.|j is what they want in hawaii, but probably not that big. i sometimes wonder if i live my life in an uncertainty cone. what about our weather forecast. the british weather, one thing not a certain is that things will get cooler over the next couple of days. still some warmth over the south and east of the country. thicker cloud over the north—west. outbreaks of rain, which you can see on the satellite picture, working its way from the north—west. this is a weather front that divides the warm and humid air in place across the south—east, from the cooler and fresh conditions up to the north. we will all get into those over the next day or so. for the rest of this afternoon, the front bringing patchy rain over northern england, down into the midlands and wales. we have a bit of sunshine, temperatures of 25, 26. some spells of sunshine. this evening and overnight, the frontal system working south—eastwards over england and wales. perhaps pepping
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up, some heavy rain for a time in the south—west and midlands. behind the south—west and midlands. behind the clearing skies it will turn quite cool, relative to previous nights. 9 degrees in newcastle and some rural spots lower than that. rain in the north west. another cold front coming in, sitcoms across the country will would get some cool let air, coming from a long way north. this air essentially coming from a long way away, from the arctic and evenin long way away, from the arctic and even in the summer that will not be a warm wind direction. a bit of rain in the south—east tomorrow, and another band of rain across scotland, northern england and northern wales. hefty showers packing into the north—west blowing in on packing into the north—west blowing inona packing into the north—west blowing in on a brisk breeze. especially on the western side of scotland. some green shadings in the temperatures on the temperature chart. even where
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we have been in the mid—20s in the last few days, 23 in london, 15 in the north and west. on friday, we all into the cool air from the north. there will be some sunshine, it‘s not a write—off, but some showers, some heavy and thundery particularly in the north—west. 15-19d. it particularly in the north—west. 15—19d. it maybe we do not get as far as 20 degrees on friday. that leads to a pretty mixed weekend for many, the bank holiday for many, there will be sunshine and rain at times with cool days and the nights chilly. in fact, some of us could see a touch of ground frost. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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donald trump‘s presidency has been rocked by developments in two criminal investigations involving one—time members of his inner circle. his former lawyer, michael cohen, convicted of violating campaign finance laws, says the president directed him to pay hush money to two women. donald trump took to twitter, claiming two of the counts admitted by mr cohen were not crimes at all and that his former campaign chief paul manafort, who in a serarate case was convicted of eight counts of fraud, was "a brave man". the financial ombudsman service has criticised banks for failing to treat customers fairly when they fall victim to fraud. it says the banks regularly try to avoid paying a refund, by wrongly claiming that customers were grossly negligent. facebook says it has disrupted a series of misinformation campaigns originating from iran and russia
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ahead of the us mid—term elections in november. and numerous accounts. sport now on afternoon live with olly. all over at trent bridge quickly. very quickly, a big win for india. they couldn‘t finish off england last night, they have to come back this morning for the one wicket they needed. 203 runs, the margin of victory. jimmy anderson was the last man out inside the first three overs of the day, india keeping the series alive, england 2—1 up with two to play. but the momentum is really with india. and england‘s batting, bar a big partnership bewteen jos buttler and ben stokes, looked very frail. they are going to have to work out whether this is just a blip or whether they are going to have to make a fair few changes for the fourth test, which is around the corner next week at southampton.
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surely the selectors will make a few changes. it's obviously not good enough in this format. with the group of players we've got, it's well below par and what we're capable of doing, even if it is bowler—friendly conditions. so we've reverted back to a few things that have worked well for us in the past. we now have to carry that forward and do it for longer periods of time. we're definitely in the driving seat as far as the series goes. we have to keep remembering that. we've got time now to reflect on what has been a difficult week. but we are a very good side, bouncing back from a tough couple of days. one thing you can never question about this group of players is their character and the way they can respond to a difficult period of play. and the way they can respond it has been a difficult couple of
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days for england, but now they head off to hampshire, the rose bowl at the end of next week and then the ovalfor the end of next week and then the oval for the the end of next week and then the ovalfor the final the end of next week and then the oval for the final test. that could bea oval for the final test. that could be a decider. what did they do about tickets that had been sold for today when there was so little play? they had been on sale for £10, good value for a day of test match. obviously, it became clear that the final day wasn‘t going to last long at all. notts wasn‘t going to last long at all. n otts cou nty wasn‘t going to last long at all. notts county cricket club, who staged the test, had sold 2000 those tickets. they came in for a lot of fla k tickets. they came in for a lot of flak on social media last night and overnight, saying, this is ridiculous, why pay £10 for what turned out to be two overs and a bit. they released their own statement this morning saying, we got it wrong. we are going to refund all those tickets. and you can come infor all those tickets. and you can come in forfree. but all those tickets. and you can come in for free. but it was all a bit late, or early in the day this morning. they got a few through the door and theyjust morning. they got a few through the door and they just ask morning. they got a few through the door and theyjust ask people to make a contribution to some local charities. certainly a lesson
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learned when it comes to ticketing. now, the assistant referees were used at the wilcock, but they might be used in other competitions as well? dreaded var. it was considered to be a great success over the summer as it was used at a world cup for the first time. we saw a lot more penalties being awarded, but fifa seemed more than happy that more correct decisions were being made. every major european league uses it except the premier league and uefa have come under pressure to use it in their competiitons, namely the champions league. but they say: wwe still see several uncertainties regarding the implementation of var.
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we will continue to monitor results to see how the system could work while preserving the flow of the game before deciding to introduce it in our competitions". some have suggested it could be used in knockout matches, but they are going to look at it a little longer. now, thierry henry could be moving into management. remember, he was linked with the aston villa job over the summer, but that came to nothing. thierry henry has agreed to become the new manager of bordeaux, according to reports in france. he‘s been a member of the belgian coaching team under roberto martinez for the past two years. they finished third in this year‘s world cup. he‘s quit all his media committments. if confirmed, he‘ll take over from the former premier league manager gus poyet, who was suspended by the club last week for publically criticising the sale of a player. kyle lafferty has returned to former club rangers after hearts accepted an improved offerfor the player. the northern ireland international was previously at ibrox between 2008 and 2012. lafferty could make his debut in tomorrow‘s europa league qualifier against ufa,
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with clubs permitted to register two wildcard signings the day before a uefa competition fixture. that‘s all the sport for now. thank you very much. a quarter of school age children have never been taken for a sight test by their parents — that‘s according to a survey by the association of optometrists, which says that children are developing permanent vision problems because they are not being examined early enough. a sight check for 15—year—old eve. she has one good eye and one lazy eye. it‘s a condition called amblyopia, and affects around 3% of people. well done, let‘s have a look at the letters with your other eye. if it‘s not treated early, it can lead to permanent sight loss in the weak eye. eve was diagnosed at seven.
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it‘s just a shock at how much difference there was. my right eye, i can see and it‘s clear, and everything is how it should be. but as soon as they cover it up, everything is blurry. it‘s quite scary, because i can‘t see out of this eye. it made me feel like a terrible parent, really, because you want to do your best by your children, and finding out that there's a problem which could have been sorted earlier, but you weren't aware of it, was really hard to handle. children should have an eye test at around three years old. then if a lazy eye is detected, vision can still be improved using a combination of glasses and an eye patch to cover the strong eye, forcing the weak eye to work. after the age of seven or eight, it becomes very difficult to treat because the eyes are fully formed. a survey from the association of optometrists found around a quarter of children have never been to an eye test, and around half of parents believe their child will have a full sight test at primary school. that is not always the case. well, it‘s a bit of a postcode
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lottery at the moment, with screening being available in some areas, but not universally, across—the—boa rd. amblyopia has few symptoms. parents often don‘t know there is a problem until it is too late. taking a child for their free eye test at around three years of age is key. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. in a moment, we‘ll be looking at a few other stories from across the nation, but first, we go to amelia reynolds in cambridge. there, look east have been looking into the huge discrepancy between the length of time women are having to wait for their smear test results.
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in some parts of the country it‘s just weeks whereas elsewhere, some women are waiting more than three months. it is all down to the way these tests are being analysed. traditionally, the smears are analysed by technicians, but that ta kes analysed by technicians, but that takes time. now there is a machine which can speed up that process. this machine filters the samples first, picking out those with problems, and then screams for the hpv virus which causes 99% of cervical cancer. those samples which test positive will then be further looked at. but as a result of this new technology, the number of testing labs around the uk is being cut from 50 to 13. this is where the problem comes, because staff at those sites not using the screening machines are worried they will be
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out of a job. that means the whole system at the moment is really short staffed. that is why we are getting these delays. in norwich, where they do have one of these new machines which is being trialled, women are getting their results in as little asa getting their results in as little as a week. in cambridge, suffolk and parts of essex, it is much longer. we spoke to sue me him from hertfordshire, who has already gone through treatment for breast cancer. she had her smear test 11 weeks ago and she‘s still waiting those results. i think ithinkl i think i have been let down by the nhs. an anxious because i know i have already had cancer and there was a distinct possibility therefore that i could get it again and it could come in cervical cancer, just as it came easily in breast cancer. so it is sleepless nights and just worrying all the time. what has the response been from the nhs? nhs
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england say as a result of these delays, the machines will now be introduced in labs earlier than planned. they also is that they are aware that patients in the east of england are currently having to wait much longer than expected. they want to reassure them that they are working to try and free up capacity. i know that lab staff in norwich, where there is one of these new machines, are working overtime and at weekends to help in the screening for other places. what impact on a wall in‘s health might delay in getting the test results have‘s —— what impact on a woman might have? the good news is that it is unlikely to cause any risk to health because cervical cancer takes a long time to develop. but of course, that doesn‘t ta ke develop. but of course, that doesn‘t take away the anxiety and the feeling of stress of not knowing, as we heard from sue meehan, especially
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if you have already had a cancer diagnosis like she had. if you are waiting longer than you should, and the target is two weeks to get your results, you should contact your gp, get some guidance on what the waiting time is in your area and some reassurance if you‘re worried. but the main message we are getting from the health professionals is, don‘t let all of this put you off going for a test in the first place. interestingly, the screening process was introduced in the 1980s. it has been around for a while and since then, the number of cervical cancer cases has fallen by around 7% each year, which is a success story. amelia reynolds at look east in cambridge, thank you very much. let‘s take a look at some of other stories across the uk this afternoon — and police have discovered an illegal gun factory on an industrial estate in east sussex. components for around 30 handguns and a large quanity of ammunition was discovered at a warehouse in hailsham. officers arrested three men at the scene — using a taser to detain one of them.
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the men are charged with firearms offences and will appear at kingston crown court next month. the gap between public sector revenue and spending in scotland as a proportion of economic activity has fallen from 8.3% to 7.9%. it means that scotland‘s deficit as a proportion of economic activity has been cut from 8.9% to 7.9 %. has been cut from 8.9% to 7.9%. but the country‘s public sector deficit is still proportionately larger than that for the united kingdom as a whole. the first minister, nicola sturgeon, said the figures showed that scotland‘s economy was on the right trajectory. but the scottish secretary, david mundell, speaking for the uk government, said it was concerning that scotland‘s public sector deficit was proportionately four times that for the united kingdom as a whole. up to 30 people have been treated by medical teams at a shopping centre in glasgow after complaining of breathing problems. emergency services were called to the silverburn centre in the pollok area of the city earlier this afternoon and the centre was evacuated. it‘s since reopened. young children were among those treated for inhaling fumes —
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but no one has been taken to hospital. it‘s believed the problem may have been caused by paint fumes circulating through an air vent. winter used to be the most popular time to plan a summer break, but holiday let companies in wales say they‘ve seen a surge in 2019 bookings already. across the country, rentals for next year are well ahead of what they would normally be, with popular hot spots like tenby in pembrokeshire seeing almost three times as many bookings compared to this time last year. and if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can see them on the bbc iplayer. maryam is here with the business
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news and i have my eyebrow of reprimand ready! first, here are the headlines. president trump accuses his former lawyer michael cohen of making up "stories" in order to get a plea deal, after he admitted violating campaign finance laws. the financial ombudsman criticises banks for being too ready to blame customers for losing money to fraudsters. facebook and twitter say they‘ve taken down hundreds of accounts linked to iran and russia containing misinformation campaigns. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: price comparison websites offering car insurance policies are rife with errors according to the consumer body which? they say millions of consumers "are not getting a clear picture from the websites they visit and are receiving policy documents that differ to what was offered online". more turbulence at ryanair — angry passengers say compensation
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cheques they received from the airline for cancelled flights have bounced because they were unsigned. rya nair has apologised and blamed the problem on an "administrative error". the bank of england says scrapping one and two pence coins won‘t automatically round up prices. the statement comes after the government recently ruled out scrapping coppers, over fears that that may lead to rise in prices. so it looks like a record breaking day on the stock market? in america, we are looking at the longest ball run —— bull run in their history. the s&p 500 share index, which tracks the 500 biggest public companies in america, is poised for a new record. by the end today‘s trading, the index will have gone 3,453 days
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without a fall of 20% or more, marking the longest rally ever in us history. we have heard various reasons for this, including strong stocks and shares. since march 2009, the index has risen almost 325% in the period, lifted by companies such as apple, microsoft and amazon. at the end of today, it will be 3000 days without a fall of 20% or more. it looks like sterling‘s recovered some of its lost ground over the past few weeks. yes. it‘s just above 1.29 against the us dollar which is its highest level in two weeks. the dollar is weakening. however, some investors are still not convinced a brexit deal will be reached, so that‘s certainly one to keep an eye on. what is the effect of the bull run
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on the strength of the dollar? the dollar is weakening. that means the pound is strengthening. that is why the bull run has had an impact on the bull run has had an impact on the dollar in that sense. we have also had some results out today from laura ashley. they do do beautiful fabrics and furniture, i don‘t know if you shop there. i used to work there. i used to work at selfridges. we must have worked down the road from each other. i was in boston, massachusetts. i was in oxford street! fashion and homeware retailer laura ashley has reported a 98% drop in profits amid "challenging" trading conditions. in the year tojune, annual pre—tax profits fell to £100,000 from £6.3m the previous year. but it is for a number of good reasons including an accounting
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write—offs on the sale of a property in singapore. and their share prices up in singapore. and their share prices up 25% in the markets. and we are talking about money and mental health? yes. people with mental health issues face huge extra premiums or are refused travel insurance — even when their problems are well managed. new research from the money and mental health policy institute shows that several insurers hiked premiums by over 400% for people who disclosed mental health problems. they also found one in three people tackling the issue have travelled with no insurance to cover their mental health. as a result of rising premiums, 45% of people with mental health problems "never" disclose their illness to their travel insurer. helen undy, who‘s a director at the money and mental health policy institute, feels the premiums
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are not justified. there are some circumstances in which your mental health might cause you to incur hospital bills on holiday, if you are particularly unwell, for example. and it is reasonable that your premiums might cost more if you have an acute problem such as a mental health problem such as a mental health problem that is likely to affect you in that way. so when you go through your application for travel insurance, they will ask you about your diagnosis and whether you are taking medication. so we would expect some premium increases when you disclose that kind of information. we are seeing increases across the board, even when those conditions are very old and historic. and even with people living with the conditions now, the increases we are seeing are enormous. we have heard of people getting premium increases of 2000% or being offered premiums that cost more while excluding any pay—outs related to their mental health.
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and a look at the markets. yes. we have seen house builders rising. they have been energised by government policies to help first—time buyers. but the rise has not helped the wider market much. the london market is in positive territory, but it is just about flat. there are a lot of concerns among investors concerned about trade issues between the us and china, and concerns about the direction of the global economy. so the london market closes with its head just above water, which is nice. thank you, maryam. over 400,000 sites have now been listed for protection by historic england. the latest additions to the national heritage list include the head office of the bike manufacturer raleigh in nottingham, and an art art deco terminal building at birmingham airport. lizo mzimba has more. voiceover: the duchess goes on to birmingham to open the new airport that has cost well over a quarter of
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a million pounds... the elmdon building, opened almost 80 years ago by the duchess of kent, was the original terminal at what was to later become birmingham airport. it‘s now been given listed status as an outstanding piece of 1930s art deco architecture. the number of listed sites in england has now reached 400,000, thanks to today‘s latest additions. the criteria are quite wide—ranging, some of the time it will be to do with architecture or merit in quality, sometimes to do with engineering, innovation and design innovation. other times, it will be to do with an amazing story to do with the community or an individual, orjust the sheer beauty of a space or a place. other buildings to be newly listed include birches "squatter‘s cottage" in shropshire, a now rare example of the kind of agricultural accommodation that was once common in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. the former raleigh cycle company head office in nottingham is also included. it has an exterior decorated
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with panels showing children holding bicycle parts and tools, mimicking a production line. it was built in 1931 and for many years, the firm was the world‘s biggest manufacturer of bicycles. and more recent buildings like plymouth‘s theatre royal, which was opened in 1982 and which is seen as a striking and sophisticated example of 20th—century design. being listed means a site receives special protection, hopefully ensuring that it can continue to be appreciated and enjoyed by future generations. lizo mzimba, bbc news. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today. next, the bbc news at five with jane hill. time for a look at the weather. this is the last day of high temperatures across eastern and south—eastern areas for the time being, so make the most of it if you do like the warmth. this is how it looked earlier in norfolk. further north and west,
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things are already changing, with cloud and outbreaks of rain courtesy of this weather front. you can see a stripe of cloud on the recent satellite picture. behind that, we get into increasingly cool air. that is the big story of the next few days. things are going to start to feel very different. for the rest of this afternoon, there is patchy rain through northern england and wales. to the south, still very warm. further north, much cooler and fresher. this evening, we continue to push our frontal system southeastwards, the rain turning heavierfor a time. to the north of that, temperatures may get into single digits.
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there is more rain pushing into the far north—west and that is associated with the next frontal system. this is really going to open the door to some much cooler air. it is extensive and we are going to start to really tap into that as we head towards the end of the week. this first frontal system is bringing rain across east anglia and the south—east. the second one is fizzling as it moves across northern england into wales. behind that, a mixture of sunny spells and heavy, thundery, blustery showers. quite a breezy day, particularly up to the north—west. and a very different feel. you can see some green shades showing up on our temperature charts. in the south—east, temperatures will be lower than they have been. on friday, all of us are into that much cooler air. a mixture of sunny spells and showers. some of the showers will be heavy and thundery,
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but these temperatures are a little below par for the time of year. the weekend is a mixed affair. there will be sunny spells and rain at times. some cool days and some pretty chilly nights. tonight at 5:00: intense pressure on president trump as his former lawyer implicates him in criminal behaviour. michael cohen pleaded guilty in court to misuse of campaign funds — claiming mrtrump had directed him to pay hush—money to alleged former mistresses. michael cohen says he‘s ready to "tell everything" — but the president has tweeted to say cohen had made up stories in order to get a deal. we‘ll be live in washington to ask what all this means for president trump.
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the other main stories on bbc news at 5:00... the trauma of being a victim of a financial scam — banks are told not to automatically blame the customer. an illegal gun factory is uncovered by crime investigators on an industrial estate in east sussex.
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